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Research Project: BIOCONTROL OF INVASIVE PESTS SUCH AS EMERALD ASH BORER AND QUARANTINE SERVICES

Location: Beneficial Insects Introduction Research Unit

Title: Damage and comprehensive control of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire

Author
item Yuan, Sun - Heilongjiang Bayi Agricultural University (HLAU)
item Xi Wei, Wang - Northeast Forestry University
item Duan, Jian
item Gui, Qiang Wang - Heilongjiang Bayi Agricultural University (HLAU)

Submitted to: Journal of Engineering and Applied Science
Publication Type: Review Article
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/10/2012
Publication Date: 11/30/2012
Publication URL: http://c.g.wanfangdata.com.cn/periodical-hljsz.aspx
Citation: Yuan, S., Xi Wei, W., Duan, J.J., Gui, Q. 2012. Damage and comprehensive control of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire. Journal of Engineering and Applied Science. 3 (4): 38 – 40.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is an invasive beetle that has killed millions of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) since it was accidentally introduced to North America in the 1990s. Development of integrated control strategies for managing this forest pest is urgently needed in both US and its native range. Toward this end, we reviewed the recent advances in our understanding its dispersal and damage patterns in both its native range (Northeast Asia) and newly invaded region (North America). We propose that an integrated control strategy is needed to successfully manage this serious invasive pest in the newly invaded areas. This integrated control strategy may include (1) regulatory restriction of movement of EAB-infested ash materials between infested and non-infested areas or regions, (2) enhanced host tree resistance via appropriate forest management measures, (3) physical control by removing and destroying infested trees, (4) chemical control and (5) biological control via release, establishment and conservation of natural enemies such as larval and egg parasitoids.