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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: FORAGE SYSTEMS FOR SUSTAINABLE ANIMAL PRODUCTION IN THE MID-SOUTH

Location: Forage-animal Production Research

Title: Endophytes of native grasses from South America:biodiversity and ecology)

Author
item Iannone, Leopoldo
item Novas, Maria
item Young, Carolyn
item De Battista, Jose
item Schardl, Christopher

Submitted to: Fungal Ecology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/24/2011
Publication Date: 8/6/2011
Citation: Iannone, L.J., Novas, M.V., Young, C.A., De Battista, J.P., Schardl, C.L. 2011. Endophytes of native grasses from South America:biodiversity and ecology. Fungal Ecology. 5:357-363.

Interpretive Summary: We review and present preliminary results of studies on cool-season grass endophytes native to South America. These fungi have been studied only in Argentina, where they have been detected in 36 native grass species. The hybrid Neotyphodium tembladerae is present in an extremely wide host range found in diverse environmental conditions, but some other endophytes seem to be strictly associated with one host species in a particular environment. In host species that inhabit different environments, the incidence of endophytes is highly variable among populations and in most of the cases is clearly associated with environmental conditions. In these native grasses, Neotyphodium presents a mutualistic behaviour, conferring enhanced growth, promoting the symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, and inhibiting growth of pathogenic fungi. In native forage grasses, preliminary analyses indicate that some Argentinian endophytes can produce lolines but are unlikely to produce lolitrem B or ergot alkaloids.

Technical Abstract: We review and present preliminary results of studies on cool-season grass endophytes native to South America. These fungi have been studied only in Argentina, where they have been detected in 36 native grass species. The hybrid Neotyphodium tembladerae is present in an extremely wide host range found in diverse environmental conditions, but some other endophytes seem to be strictly associated with one host species in a particular environment. In host species that inhabit different environments, the incidence of endophytes is highly variable among populations and in most of the cases is clearly associated with environmental conditions. In these native grasses, Neotyphodium presents a mutualistic behaviour, conferring enhanced growth, promoting the symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, and inhibiting growth of pathogenic fungi. In native forage grasses, preliminary analyses indicate that some Argentinian endophytes can produce lolines but are unlikely to produce lolitrem B or ergot alkaloids.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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