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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » National Clonal Germplasm Repository » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #282555

Title: Genetic and developing genomic resources in black raspberry

Author
item Bassil, Nahla
item Dossett, Michael - Agriculture And Agri-Food Canada
item Hummer, Kim
item Mockler, Todd - Danforth Plant Science Center
item Filichkin, Sergei - Oregon State University
item Peterson, Mary
item Lee, Jungmin
item Fernandez, Gina - North Carolina State University
item Perkins-veazie, Penelope - North Carolina State University
item Weber, Courtney - Cornell University - New York
item Agunga, Robert - Ohio University
item Rhodes, Emily - Ohio University
item Scheerens, Joseph - Ohio University
item Lewers, Kimberly
item Graham, Julie - Scottish Crops Research Institute (SCRI)
item Fernandez-fernandez, Felicidad - East Malling Research
item Yun, Song - Chonbuk National University
item Finn, Chad

Submitted to: Acta Horticulturae
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/15/2012
Publication Date: 8/1/2014
Publication URL: http://www.actahort.org/books/1048/1048_1.htm
Citation: Bassil, N.V., Dossett, M., Hummer, K.E., Mockler, T., Filichkin, S., Peterson, M.E., Lee, J., Fernandez, G., Perkins-Veazie, P., Weber, C., Agunga, R., Rhodes, E., Scheerens, J.C., Lewers, K.S., Graham, J., Fernandez Fernandez, F., Yun, S.J., Finn, C.E. 2014. Genetic and developing genomic resources in black raspberry. Acta Horticulturae. 1048:19-24.

Interpretive Summary: Over the last 75 years, the black raspberry industry in the United States has steadily declined due to lack of adapted and disease resistant cultivars. The health benefits of black raspberries have revived interest in production and breeding new cultivars. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Service, National Clonal Germplasm Repository preserves and maintains a collection of over 230 black raspberries. Wild black raspberries collected in their native range across 27 US states and two Canadian provinces were recently included in this collection. Evaluation of these wild plants led to the identification of four sources of aphid resistance. Two of these were crossed with known cultivars to produce two populations that contain individuals that are resistant to aphids. Funding was recently obtained from the USDA’s Specialty Crops Research Initiative (SCRI) to develop the genomic infrastructure for breeding improved black raspberries. A major focus of this project is to develop molecular tools for use in black and red raspberry breeding. We will study genotype by environment interactions in thes black raspberry populations in four different production regions across North America and apply these molecular tools to the identification of DNA regions important for breeding. In this report, we present the current status of genetic and genomic resources in black raspberry.

Technical Abstract: Over the last 75 years, the black raspberry industry in the United States has steadily declined due to lack of adapted and disease resistant cultivars. The high anthocyanin content of black raspberry and associated health benefits have revived interest in production and breeding new cultivars. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Service, National Clonal Germplasm Repository manages black raspberry germplasm and maintains a collection of over 175 accessions. Wild black raspberries collected in their native range from more than 130 locations across 27 US states and two Canadian provinces were recently added to this collection. Evaluation of this wild germplasm led to the identification of four sources of aphid resistance, two of which were introgressed into the elite breeding pool in two mapping populations. A major focus of this project is to develop, and make available, genomic tools including linkage and physical maps, a draft genome assembly, ESTs, SNP and SSR markers for use in black and red raspberry breeding. We will study genotype by environment interactions in this black raspberry germplasm in four different production regions across North America and apply the genomic tools to identify QTL important for breeding objectives. These tools will facilitate informed decisions regarding germplasm value and usage, crossing, and selection through marker-assisted breeding, and will be useful for breeding programs across the U.S. Here, we present the current status of global genetic resources and genomic research in black raspberry.