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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » National Clonal Germplasm Repository » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #280364

Title: Developing the genomic infrastructure for breeding black raspberry

Author
item Bassil, Nahla
item Dossett, Michael - Agriculture And Agri-Food Canada
item Gilmore, Barbara - Barb
item Mockler, Todd - Danforth Plant Science Center
item Filichkin, Sergei - Oregon State University
item Peterson, Mary
item Lee, Jungmin
item Fernandez, Gina - North Carolina State University
item Perkins-veazie, Penelope - North Carolina State University
item Weber, Courtney - Cornell University - New York
item Agunga, Robert - The Ohio State University
item Rhoades, Emily - The Ohio State University
item Scheerens, Joseph - The Ohio State University
item Yang, Wei - Oregon State University
item Lewers, Kimberly
item Graham, Julie - The James Hutton Institute
item Fernandez-fernandez, Felicidad - East Malling Research
item Yun, Song Joong - Chonbuk National University
item Finn, Chad

Submitted to: American Society of Horticulture Science Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/27/2012
Publication Date: 4/27/2012
Citation: Bassil, N.V., Dossett, M., Gilmore, B.S., Mockler, T., Filichkin, S., Peterson, M.E., Lee, J., Fernandez, G., Perkins-Veazie, P., Weber, C., Agunga, R., Rhoades, E., Scheerens, J.C., Yang, W., Lewers, K.S., Graham, J., Fernandez-Fernandez, F., Yun, S., Finn, C.E. 2012. Developing the genomic infrastructure for breeding black raspberry. [abstract]. 2015 American Society for Horticultural Science Annual Conference. Abstract 10778.

Interpretive Summary: Over the last 75 years, the black raspberry industry in the United States has steadily declined due to lack of adapted and disease resistant cultivars. The reported health benefits of black raspberry have revived interest in production and breeding new cultivars. Wild black raspberries were collected in their native range from locations across 27 US states and two Canadian provinces and added to the USDA-ARS NCGR collection. Evaluation of these wild plants led to the identification of four sources of aphid resistance. Two of these were crossed with known cultivars to produce two populations. Funding was recently obtained from the USDA’s Specialty Crops Research Initiative to make breeding improved black raspberries more efficient with molecular approaches. A major focus of this project is to develop DNA tools for black and red raspberry breeding. Studying genotype by environment interactions in black raspberry in four different production regions across North America and applying these molecular tools will allow us to identify DNA regions important for breeding.

Technical Abstract: Over the last 75 years, the black raspberry industry in the United States has steadily declined due to a lack of adapted and disease resistant cultivars. The high anthocyanin content of black raspberry and associated health benefits have revived interest in production and breeding new cultivars. Wild black raspberries were recently collected in their native range from more than 130 locations across 27 US states and two Canadian provinces. Evaluation of this wild germplasm led to the identification of four sources of aphid resistance, two of which were introgressed into the elite breeding pool in two mapping populations. Funding was recently obtained from the USDA’s Specialty Crops Research Initiative (SCRI) to develop the genomic infrastructure for breeding improved black raspberries. The objectives of this project include (1) the development of genomic tools for breeding black raspberry, (2) maintaining or enhancing primary and secondary metabolites in selections, and (3) assessment of consumer preferences and identification of factors that can enhance fresh and processing market expansion. We have begun constructing a linkage map, assembling a draft genome, and generating new microsatellite markers and EST sequences from different black raspberry tissues. The mapping populations have been propagated and will be planted in four different production regions across North America. Phenotypic and genotypic information will be used to identify quantitative trait loci important for breeding objectives. The results will inform decisions regarding germplasm value and usage, crossing, and selection through marker-assisted breeding and phytochemical quality, and will be useful for breeding programs across the U.S.