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Research Project: INTERVENTION STRATEGIES TO CONTROL VIRAL DISEASES OF SWINE

Location: Virus and Prion Research

Title: National surveillance for swine influenza virus in the United States, 2009-present

Author
item SCHILTZ, JOHN - Animal And Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)
item KORSLUND, JOHN - Animal And Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)
item PYBURN, DAVE - Animal And Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)
item SWENSON, SABRINA - Animal And Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)
item TOMLINSON, SARAH - Animal And Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)
item KASARI, ELLEN - Animal And Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)
item Vincent, Amy

Submitted to: Pig Veterinary Society International Congress Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/1/2012
Publication Date: 6/10/2012
Citation: Schiltz, J., Korslund, J.A., Pyburn, D., Swenson, S., Tomlinson, S., Kasari, E.M., Vincent, A.L. 2012. National surveillance for swine influenza virus in the United States, 2009-present. Proceedings of the 22nd International Pig Veterinary Society Congress. p. 415.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Background and Objectives. In April 2009, a National surveillance plan for swine influenza virus in swine was implemented in the United States. Initial focus of the surveillance was to detect the presence and distribution of viruses (especially the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza, A(H1N1)pdm09) that are or may be of public health concern. The current objectives of the National Surveillance Program are: [1] Monitor genetic evolution of endemic swine influenza viruses to better understand endemic and emerging influenza virus ecology; [2] Make virus isolates available for research and establish an objective database for genetic analysis of these isolates and related information; and [3] Select proper isolates for the development of relevant diagnostic reagents, updating diagnostic assays, and vaccine seed stock products. Methods. There are three components of influenza surveillance in swine; [a] Surveillance of swine observed with influenza-like illness (ILI) on farms from which samples are submitted for laboratory testing, [b] Surveillance of swine epidemiologically linked to a human case of novel influenza virus, and [c] Surveillance of swine observed with signs of ILI at first points of concentration or comingling events, particularly where there is potential high exposure to humans. Surveillance data include total animals and specimens tested, state of origin of the samples, reason for submission, tests conducted on the samples and their results, as well as sequence information if virus was isolated. Results and Conclusions. Data analysis was underway at the time of IPVS abstract submission. An up to date summary of the surveillance data collected through the United States National Swine Influenza Surveillance Program will be presented at the meeting.