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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Madison, Wisconsin » Vegetable Crops Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #270705

Title: Rapid cycling with true potato seed

Author
item Jansky, Shelley
item Hamernik, Andy
item Cai, Xingkui - Huazhong Agricultural University

Submitted to: Seed Science and Technology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/1/2011
Publication Date: 4/1/2012
Citation: Jansky, S.H., Hamernik, A.J., Cai, X. 2012. Rapid cycling with true potato seed. Seed Science and Technology. 40(1):43-50.

Interpretive Summary: Commercially, potatoes are planted from tuber pieces rather than true seed. However, true seed is generated for breeding and genetics research. In order to carry out multiple generations in a year, rapid cycling strategies must be developed. This study was carried out to determine the fruit ripening and seed treatment conditions needed for generating true potato seed with a high germination rate in a short period of time. The speed of germination and the total final percent germination of cultivated potato seed was higher than that from a wild relative. Seed germination was enhanced when sown without drying and after treatment with gibberellic acid to break dormancy. The development of seed in fruit on the vine for three weeks and then off the vine for two weeks is recommended for rapid cycling.

Technical Abstract: Rapid generation cycling via true seed production can increase the efficiency of potato breeding programs and genetics studies. This study was carried out to determine the fruit ripening and seed treatment conditions needed for generating true potato seed (TPS) with a high germination rate in a short period of time. The speed of germination and the total final percent germination of TPS derived from Solanum tuberosum was faster and higher than that derived from the wild species S. chacoense. Seed germination was enhanced when TPS was sown without drying and after treatment with gibberellic acid (GA3). The development of TPS in fruit on the vine for three weeks and then off the vine for two weeks is recommended for rapid cycling of TPS.