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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: LIVESTOCK LOSSES FROM ABORTIFACIENT AND TERATOGENIC PLANTS

Location: Poisonous Plant Research

Title: Alkaloid profiling as an approach to differentiate Lupinus garfieldensis, Lupinus sabinianus, and Lupinus sericeus)

Author
item Cook, Daniel
item Lee, Stephen
item Pfister, James - Jim
item Stonecipher, Clinton - Clint
item Welch, Kevin
item Green, Benedict - Ben
item Panter, Kip

Submitted to: Phytochemical Analysis
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/15/2011
Publication Date: 9/26/2011
Publication URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pca.1355/pdf
Citation: Cook, D., Lee, S.T., Pfister, J.A., Stonecipher, C.A., Welch, K.D., Green, B.T., Panter, K.E. 2011. Alkaloid profiling as an approach to differentiate Lupinus garfieldensis, Lupinus sabinianus, and Lupinus sericeus. Phytochemical Analysis. 23(3): 278-84.

Interpretive Summary: Many species in the Lupinus genus are poorly defined morphologically, potentially resulting in improper taxonomic identification. Lupine species may contain quinolizidine and/or piperidine alkaloids that can be acutely toxic and/or teratogenic, the latter resulting in crooked calf disease. The characteristic alkaloid profiles of Lupinus sabinianus, L. garfieldensis and L. sericeus were identified to aid in discriminating these species from each other and from L. sulphureus. Each of the three species investigated contained a diagnostic chemical fingerprint composed of quinolizidine and/or piperidine alkaloids. Alkaloid profiling can be used as a tool to discriminate these species from each other and L. sulphureus as long as one considers locality of the collection.

Technical Abstract: Introduction – Many species in the Lupinus genus are poorly defined resulting in improper taxonomic identification. Lupine species may contain quinolizidine and/or piperidine alkaloids that can be acutely toxic and/or teratogenic resulting in crooked calf disease. Objective – To identify any characteristic alkaloid profiles of Lupinus sabinianus, L. garfieldensis, and L. sericeus which would aid in discriminating these species from each other and from L. sulphureus. Methods and Materials – Quinolizidine and piperidine alkaloids were extracted from herbarium specimens and recent field collections of L. sabinianus, L. garfieldensis and L. sericeus. The alkaloid composition of each species was defined using GC/FID and GC/MS and compared using multivariate statistics. Results – Each of the three species investigated contained a diagnostic chemical fingerprint composed of quinolizidine and/or piperidine alkaloids. Conclusion – The alkaloid profiles of Lupinus sabinianus, L. garfieldensis, and L. sericeus can be used as a tool to discriminate these species from each other and L. sulphureus as long as one considers locality of the collection in the case of L. sabinianus.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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