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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » Horticultural Crops Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #260273

Title: Low N Supply, but Not Low P or K supply, Alters Pinot noir growth, yield, and berry aroma profiles

Author
item Schreiner, R Paul
item Du, Xiaofen - Oregon State University
item Qian, Michael - Oregon State University
item Lee, Jungmin

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/30/2009
Publication Date: 6/20/2010
Citation: Schreiner, R.P., Du, X., Qian, M., Lee, J. 2010. Low N Supply, but Not Low P or K supply, Alters Pinot noir growth, yield, and berry aroma profiles. International Cool Climate Symposium Program Book.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: To understand how nutrients influence the growth, physiology, and berry quality attributes of Pinot noir, the supply of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) to vines grown in a sand-culture vineyard were each independently manipulated from 2006-2008. Vines received complete nutrition during their first three establishment years (2003-2005). Low N supply reduced vine N status, low P supply reduced vine P status, and low K supply reduced vine K status as intended (based on leaf and petiole tests). However, only N treatments impacted the growth or yield of vines, and the influence of N increased over time. Early season shoot lengths, photosynthesis, yield, and berry weights were all reduced by low N supply in 2008, but not prior to this time; while dormant season pruning weights and juice yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) were lower in 2007 and 2008. Berry sugars were higher in low N vines in 2008, but pH and TA were not altered by N supply. Low N supply also increased the concentration of numerous terpene alcohols (primarily bound forms) in berries in 2008, independent of N effects on berry size or maturity. An increased concentration of norisoprenoids in berries from low N vines was attributed to N effects on berry size. Berry aroma profiles were not altered by low P or K supply. Our findings suggest that enhancing the concentrations of certain berry aroma compounds by reducing N supply to vines may not be possible without sacrificing overall vine productivity or reducing juice YAN below acceptable levels.