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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effects of roughage source and dried corn distiller's grains concentration on feedlot performance and carcass characteristics of finishing beef steers

Author
item Maxwell, Casey
item Brown, Mike
item Cole, Noel
item Coufal, Bill
item Wallace, J
item Simroth-rodriguez, J
item Pratt, S

Submitted to: Proceeding of Plains Nutrition Council Symposium
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/10/2010
Publication Date: 4/22/2010
Citation: Maxwell, C., Brown, M., Cole, N.A., Coufal, B., Wallace, J., Simroth-Rodriguez, J., Pratt, S. 2010. Effects of roughage source and dried corn distiller's grains concentration on feedlot performance and carcass characteristics of finishing beef steers [abstract]. In: Proceeding of Plains Nutrition Council Spring Conference, April 22-23, 2010, San Antonio, Texas. Pub. No. AREC 10-57, p. 106-107.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Physical attributes of roughages used in finishing diets may impact the extent of ruminal digestion of dried distiller's grains (DDG) and growth performance. Crossbred steers (n=380) were adapted to a common finishing diet, blocked by BW, implanted with Revalor-S (120 mg of trenbolone acetate and 24 mg of estradiol), and assigned to treatments of roughage source (sorghum-sudan hay [Hay] or sorghum-sudan silage [Silage]) and DDG concentration (0 or 20% of diet DM). Cattle were housed in 40 soil-surfaced pens with at least 16.7 m2 of pen space and 30.5 cm of bunk space/animal. Roughages were included on an equal NDF basis. All diets contained 3.4% non-protein N from urea (1.2% urea) and cottonseed meal was utilized as a protein source in 0% DDG diets. Cattle were fed twice/d for 108 d (initial BW = 905 +/- 27.81 lb). Steers fed 20% DDG ate 4.1% more DM than steers fed 0% DDG (23.93 vs. 22.99 lb, P = <0.01), but silage or hay did not influence DMI (P = 0.56). Overall shrunk ADG on a live basis was not altered by treatment (P > 0.56). Gain efficiency on a live basis was not altered by silage or hay (P = 0.77), but steers fed 0% DDG were 2.8% more efficient than steers fed 20% DDG (P <0.01). There was a roughage source x DDG interaction for carcass-adjusted ADG and gain efficiency, dressing percentage, hot carcass weight, and LM area (P < 0.07). Adjusted ADG was increased 7% by silage with 20% DDG (P = 0.05), but forage source did not alter ADG when 0% DDG was fed (P = 0.38). Adjusted gain efficiency was reduced (P = 0.03) 4.6% by hay with 20% DDG, but efficiency was not altered (P = 0.63) by forage source at 0% DDG. Dressing percentage was reduced by hay at 20% DDG (63.0 vs. 62.5, P = 0.02) and increased by silage at 20% DDG (62.5 vs. 63.4, P < 0.001). Hot carcass weight was not altered by DDG with hay (P = 0.37), but was increased 16 lbs with 20% DDG when silage was fed (P=0.05). The LM area was increased by silage with 20% DDG (P = 0.02), but forage source did not alter LM area at 0% DDG (P = 0.29). Marbling score was higher when DDG was fed with either silage or hay (380 vs. 390, P = 0.06). Results suggest that rate of gain on a carcass basis can be improved by feeding DDG with silage, whereas forage source was less important when no DDG was fed.

Last Modified: 07/22/2017
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