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Title: The Impact of qGPC6H on Malting Quality, Grain Composition and Agronomic Performance

Author
item FISCHER, A
item FISCHER, G
item PARROTT, D
item Budde, Allen
item BLAKE, J
item BLAKE, T

Submitted to: North American Barley Research Workshop Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/22/2008
Publication Date: 10/26/2008
Citation: Fischer, A., Fischer, G., Parrott, D., Budde, A.D., Blake, J.C., Blake, T.K. 2008. The Impact of qGPC6H on Malting Quality, Grain Composition and Agronomic Performance. In: Barley Newsletter 51, North American Barley Research Workshop Proceedings, October 26-29, 2008, Madison, Wisconsin. Poster No. 10.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: One of barley's more remarkable characteristics is its ability to tolerate variation in seed composition. Selection for increased percentage of one grain component (e.g. protein) can be accomplished by reduction in the percentage of another component (e.g. starch). Starch is the largest contributor to malt extract, and its negative correlation with grain protein percentage is widely appreciated. We previously identified a barley gene, qGPC6H, in which allelic variation significantly impacted grain protein percentage. Similar variation was observed in wheat, and the gene responsible for this variation was recently cloned. This barley version of this gene, HvNAM-1, is a transcription factor that has significant impact on the initiation of plant senescence. In barley, the allele derived from the variety 'Karl' results in delayed plant senescence with no measurable impact on flowering date. This allele also results in reduced grain protein percentage. We backcrossed the 'Karl' low grain protein percentage allele into the 2-rowed barley variety 'Lewis', producing four independently-derived backcross (BCA) lines. We also backcrossed the 'Lewis' high grain protein percentage allele into Karl, producing four independently-derived backcross lines. Dryland and irrigated replicated yield trials were performed in 2006 and 2007 with these lines. We measured grain composition from our trials in 2006 and malting quality from our trials in 2007. In this report we demonstrate that transfer of the 'Karl' allele into the 'Lewis' genetic background results in plants with higher grain yield, higher grain starch content and higher malt extract. Correspondingly, when the 'Lewis' allele is backcrossed into the Karl background, grain yield and starch percentage are reduced, as is malt extract.