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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Mississippi State, Mississippi » Poultry Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #214546

Title: DIETARY AMINO ACID RESPONSES OF BROILER CHICKENS: A REVIEW

Author
item Dozier Iii, William
item KIDD, MICHAEL
item CORZO, ALEJANDRO

Submitted to: Journal of Applied Poultry Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/20/2007
Publication Date: 1/15/2008
Citation: Dozier III, W.A., Kidd, M.T., Corzo, A. 2008. Dietary amino acid responses of broiler chickens: A Review. Journal of Applied Poultry Research. 17:157-167.

Interpretive Summary: Feed cost represents 65% of the total live production cost for broiler chickens that supports an industry that produces 8 billion birds annually. Large percentage of the cost of the diet is protein/amino acid contributing ingredients. Over the last four years, researchers at USDA-ARS and Mississippi State University have conducted numerous studies on dietary amino density to better define practical amino acid feeding levels for the broiler industry. This manuscript reviews our findings on dietary amino acid research and provides regression equations of predicting amino acid needs of broilers throughout a 49 day production cycle. These equations were based on the actual dietary amino analyses and the results that provided the best growth and feed conversion with data from seven peer-reviewed manuscripts. Daily dietary lysine percentages were estimated as Y = 9E-05x2 – 0.014x + 1.44.

Technical Abstract: In commercial practice, formulating diets to adequate amino acid (AA) minimums is critical to optimize live production and meat yield of broiler chickens. The modern broiler has lower feed intake per unit BW gain while having the potential to accrete more white meat than the commercial broiler of previous decades. Broilers consuming less feed per unit of gain have led to formulating higher AA density diets in commercial production for improved performance and meat yield. This manuscript reviews current literature in dietary AA density. In addition, it provides estimates of consumption and dietary percentages of critical AA needed to optimize growth and meat yield calculated from published research.