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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: BACTERIOCINS REDUCE CAMPYLOBACTER COLONIZATION AND ALTER GUT MORPHOLOGY IN TURKEY POULTS)

Author
item Cole, Kim
item Farnell, Morgan
item Donoghue, Ann - Annie
item Stern, Norman
item Svetoch, E
item Eruslanov, B
item Volodina, L
item Kovalev, Y
item Perelygin, V
item Mitsevich, E
item Mitsevich, I
item Levchuk, V
item Pokhilenko, V
item Borzenkov, V
item Svetoch, O
item Kudryavtseva, T
item Reyes-herrera, I
item Blore, P
item Solis de los santos, Fausto
item Donoghue, D

Submitted to: Poultry Science
Publication Type: Peer reviewed journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/25/2006
Publication Date: 9/11/2006
Citation: Cole, K., Farnell, M., Donoghue, A.M., Stern, N.J., Svetoch, E.A., Eruslanov, B.N., Volodina, L.I., Kovalev, Y.N., Perelygin, V.V., Mitsevich, E.V., Mitsevich, I.P., Levchuk, V.P., Pokhilenko, V.D., Borzenkov, V.N., Svetoch, O.E., Kudryavtseva, T.Y., Reyes-Herrera, I., Blore, P.J., Solis De Los Santos, F., Donoghue, D.J. 2006. Bacteriocins reduce campylobacter colonization and alter gut morphology in turkey poults. Poultry Science. 85:1570-1575.

Interpretive Summary: Campylobacter is a leading cause of food borne illness in the United States. Recent evidence has demonstrated that bacteriocins produced by Bacillus circulans and Paenibacillus polymyxa reduce cecal Campylobacter colonization in broiler chickens infected with Campylobacter jejuni. As Campylobacter coli is the most prevalent Campylobacter isolate recovered in turkeys, the objectives of the present study were to evaluate the efficacy of these bacteriocins against C. coli colonization and their influence on the gastrointestinal architecture of young turkeys. In three separate trials, day-of-hatch poults were orally challenged on day 3 with a mixture of three C. coli isolates. On days 10-12 post-hatch, two bacteriocin treatment groups were given free access to feed supplemented with either purified, microencapsulated bacteriocins whereas the positive controls treatment group had access to untreated feed. At the end of the 3 day dosing period, ceca and duodenal loops were collected for analysis. In each of the three separate trials, treatment with either bacteriocin eliminated detectable ceca Campylobacter concentrations versus controls. Duodenum crypt depth and goblet cell numbers were also reduced in turkeys treated with either bacteriocin versus controls. The dynamic reduction in crypt depth and goblet cell density in turkeys dosed with bacteriocin may provide clues to how bacteriocins inhibit enteric Campylobacter.

Technical Abstract: Campylobacter is a leading cause of food borne illness in the United States. Recent evidence has demonstrated that bacteriocins produced by Bacillus circulans and Paenibacillus polymyxa reduce cecal Campylobacter colonization in broiler chickens infected with Campylobacter jejuni. As Campylobacter coli is the most prevalent Campylobacter isolate recovered in turkeys, the objectives of the present study were to evaluate the efficacy of these bacteriocins against C. coli colonization and their influence on the gastrointestinal architecture of young turkeys. In three separate trials, a total of 135 day-of-hatch poults (n= 45/trial) were orally challenged on day 3 with a mixture of three C. coli isolates. On days 10-12 post-hatch, two bacteriocin treatment groups were given free access to feed supplemented with either purified, microencapsulated bacteriocins whereas the positive controls treatment group had access to untreated feed (n=10/treatment group/trial). At the end of the 3 day dosing period, ceca and duodenal loops were collected for analysis. In each of the three separate trials, treatment with either bacteriocin eliminated detectable ceca Campylobacter concentrations versus controls. Duodenum crypt depth and goblet cell numbers were also reduced in turkeys treated with either bacteriocin versus controls. The dynamic reduction in crypt depth and goblet cell density in turkeys dosed with bacteriocin may provide clues to how bacteriocins inhibit enteric Campylobacter.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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