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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Columbia, Missouri » Cropping Systems and Water Quality Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #184347

Title: WITHIN-FIELD VARIABILITY OF CROP YIELD USING A HIERARCHICAL MODEL

Author
item JIANG, PINGPING
item Kitchen, Newell
item HE, ZHUOQIONG
item Sudduth, Kenneth - Ken
item Sadler, Edward

Submitted to: ASA-CSSA-SSSA Annual Meeting Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/9/2005
Publication Date: 9/27/2005
Citation: Jiang, P., Kitchen, N.R., He, Z., Sudduth, K.A., Sadler, E.J. 2005. Within-field variability of crop yield using a hierarchical model [abstract] [CDROM]. ASA-CSSA-SSSA Annual Meeting Abstracts.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Understanding crop yield variability as affected by spatial field characteristics and varying weather conditions is critical in the development of site-specific management systems. The objective of this project was to assess the temporal and spatial effects of soil, landscape, and weather covariates on corn yield for a Missouri field. We used Bayesian hierarchical general linear modeling for this analysis. The model included a mean structure of covariates, a random spatial effect and a fixed temporal effect. Corn yield maps from a 36-ha claypan soil field were obtained using combine yield monitoring for 1997, 1999, 2001 and 2003. Yield and soil property maps were aggregated to a 30 meter spatial scale. The covariates included field elevation and slope, soil electrical conductivity (EC), mean daily maximum temperature (mTEMP) and cumulative precipitation (cPREP) for July and August. The conditional autoregressive (CAR) model was used to model the spatial association among grids. The computations were performed through Gibbs sampling using a free package, WinBugs. Results showed that the CAR model was able to capture a great deal of spatial yield association among grids. In general, slope and soil EC had a negative effect on corn yield. Further, cPREP had a positive effect while mTEMP showed a negative effect on corn yield. Temporally, yield slightly decreased over the 1997 to 2003 time period. However we do not attribute this to any long-term change in climate but simply to random occurrence.