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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Ames, Iowa » National Animal Disease Center » Infectious Bacterial Diseases Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #183848

Title: EFFECT OF EGG YOLK ON THE DETECTION OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM SUBSP. PARATUBERCULOSIS USING THE ESP II LIQUID CULTURE SYSTEM

Author
item HARRIS, N
item Robbe Austerman, Suelee
item PAYEUR, JANET

Submitted to: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/14/2005
Publication Date: 11/20/2005
Citation: Harris, N.B., Robbe Austerman, S., Payeur, J.B. 2005. Effect of egg yolk on the detection of mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis using the esp ii liquid culture system. Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation.

Interpretive Summary: The most sensitive method to diagnose Johne’s disease is fecal culture. There are currently two different methods for culturing fecal material, a liquid media system and a solid media system. In this study, the two methods were compared, and egg yolk was evaluated at different concentrations as a component of the liquid media. There was no difference in sensitivity between the liquid and solid media systems; however, the liquid media system identified positive samples earlier. Egg yolk was a necessary component of the liquid media.

Technical Abstract: Rapid diagnosis of paratuberculosis in infected cattle is important for the successful control of Johne’s disease within herds. Thus, improving culture methods for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) will aid in the identification of asymptomatic animals. Egg yolk is a component of the media used for growing M. paratuberculosis, but its requirement as a supplement has not been reported. Using the ESP II liquid culture system, two different sources and five concentrations (3.3%, 1.6%, 0.8%, 0.4% and 0%) of egg yolk were analyzed. Egg yolk source did not affect either recovery rate or time to detection, but both parameters were significantly improved when the 3.3% egg yolk concentrations (final volume) were used over media containing no egg yolk. This study also assessed the recovery of M. paratuberculosis from fecal samples that were cultured multiple times using Herrold’s Egg Yolk agar (HEY). Specimens containing greater than 70 cfu/g feces could routinely be identified as positive for M. paratuberculosis after only one culture attempt, whereas specimens with fewer bacteria were only intermittently positive, even after five replicate cultures. Therefore, this study indicates that the sensitivity of the Trek Diagnostic ESP II liquid culture system for M. paratuberculosis is affected by egg yolk concentration, and that single culture attempts using HEY solid media may not identify specimens containing low numbers of bacteria.