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ARS Home » Plains Area » Bushland, Texas » Conservation and Production Research Laboratory » Livestock Nutrient Management Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #169209

Title: AEROSOLIZED DUST PARTICULATES OF FEEDYARDS ON THE SOUTHERN HIGH PLAINS OF TEXAS

Author
item Purdy, Charles
item STRAUS, DAVID
item Clark, Ray

Submitted to: Research Workers in Animal Diseases Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/14/2004
Publication Date: 11/14/2004
Citation: Purdy, C.W., Straus, D.C., Clark, R.N. 2004. Aerosolized dust particulates of feedyards on the Southern High Plains of Texas [abstract]. In: Proceedings of the 85th Annual Conference of Research Workers in Animal Diseases, November 14-16, 2004, Chicago, Illinois. 114:52.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Dust is the number one complaint from feedyard neighbors and it is becoming a regulatory issue. It is potentially a health hazard for both humans and animals. The objectives of this study were to compare the concentration of dust particulates upwind and downwind of four large feedyards in the summer and winter. In addition, the size (PM[10] & PM[2.5]), shape and chemical composition of particulates were of interest. The basic design of the study was to compare the dust collected from the following instruments (Andersen RAAS 300 PM[10] and PM[2.5], 5 stage cyclones, and spore traps) upwind and downwind of four feedyards. Mean concentration of dust (µg/m3): PM[10]-upwind (n=64), 94 (SEM 16.9), downwind (n=64), 269 (32.4), Winter (n=64), 98 (12.9), Summer (n=64), 262 (34.3), Feedyard 1 (FY1) (n=32), 218 (38.2), FY2 (n=32), 226 (52), FY3 (n=32), 210 (38.9), FY5 (n=32), 66.1 (8.5); PM[2.5]-upwind (n=64), 17.6 (2.5), downwind (n=64), 25.1 (2.5), Winter (n=64), 15 (1.2), Summer (n=64), 27.7 (3.2), FY1 (n=32), 24.1 (2.2), FY2 (n=32), 24.4 (4.5), FY3 (n=32). 26.5 (4.7), FY5 (n=32), 10.4 (0.8). Significantly larger dust concentrations occurred in the summer and at downwind positions compared to the concentrations determined in the winter and at upwind positions. Concentration of dust in FY5 was significantly less than that observed in the other three feedyards.