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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: UMBRELLA PROJECT FOR FOOD SAFETY

Location: Warmwater Aquaculture Research Unit

2012 Annual Report


1a. Objectives (from AD-416):
Research will address methods to determine the presence of pathogens in catfish/catfish products and to maximize elimination methods. Detection techniques will be developed to aid in processing and packaging operations, which should further enhance product safety. Specifically the new objectives are: 1)Optimize safety of aquaculture products through innovative processes for reducing microbiological, physical and chemical hazards in seafood/aquaculture products. 2)Determine the mechanisms influencing microbial survival of selected pathogens in seafood/aquaculture products. 3)Optimize the market value of seafood/aquaculture products through enhanced food safety and quality.


1b. Approach (from AD-416):
Catfish. Determine optimum rates of microbial reduction through innovative processing in catfish products including evaluation of consumer acceptance. Determine viable methods of hazard reduction (smoking, acidulants, antimicrobials, etc) in catfish products during processing and storage. Determine the methods by which these methods reduce hazards within the products evaluated. Enhance the physical safety of catfish fillets with innovative analysis technology. Seafood/Produce. Determine the efficacy of IQF freezing, irradiation, and high pressure processing and other technologies on the safety and quality of oysters, shrimp and produce. Objective 2: Catfish/ Seafood/Produce. Determine the mechanistic approach by which the certain pathogenic bacteria may be reduced in aquatic species. Utilize PCR analysis and other assays to determine the sensitivity and specificity of various isolates in response to innovative treatments. Objective 3: Catfish. Enhance product value through innovative smoking and further processing of catfish fillets. Value-added analysis will compared products to commodity value for product enhancement addition. Evaluate value-added products to address potential food safety issues. Seafood/Produce. Evaluate consumer acceptance of products enhanced through various processing methods. Preparation techniques, ingredient inclusion, packaging and storage methods will be evaluated at various time frames and inclusion rates to determine specie specific parameters limitations. Analyze economics of various market potentials. Catfish. Determine optimum rates of microbial reduction through innovative processing in catfish products including evaluation of consumer acceptance. Determine viable methods of hazard reduction (smoking, acidulants, antimicrobials, etc) in catfish products during processing and storage. Determine the methods by which these methods reduce hazards within the products evaluated. Enhance the physical safety of catfish fillets with innovative analysis technology. Seafood/Produce. Determine the efficacy of IQF freezing, irradiation, and high pressure processing and other technologies on the safety and quality of oysters, shrimp and produce. Objective 2: Catfish/ Seafood/Produce. Determine the mechanistic approach by which the certain pathogenic bacteria may be reduced in aquatic species. Utilize PCR analysis and other assays to determine the sensitivity and specificity of various isolates in response to innovative treatments. Objective 3: Catfish. Enhance product value through innovative smoking and further processing of catfish fillets. Value-added analysis will compared products to commodity value for product enhancement addition. Evaluate value-added products to address potential food safety issues. Seafood/Produce. Evaluate consumer acceptance of products enhanced through various processing methods. Preparation techniques, ingredient inclusion, packaging and storage methods will be evaluated at various time frames and inclusion rates to determine specie specific parameters limitations. Analyze economics of various market potentials.


3. Progress Report:
Research related to quantification, identification and control of pathogens in food products, in particular Listeria (L.) monocytogenes, is focused on developing strategies for understanding virulence factors and reducing L. monocytogenes in catfish, seafood, and other meat products. Virulent factors for L. monocytogenes have been identified as well as proteins responsible for attachment strength on reay-to-eat (RTE) foods. This information will be critical in developing tests and protocols required to control L. monocytogenes in catfish, seafood, and other RTE products. Rapid and sensitive tests for detection of Salmonella and Escherichia (E) coli 0157:H7, and were developed, whereas tests for detection of Vibrio vulnificus and Listeria, and botulism neurotoxin are being developed and validated. These assays assay will be useful for screening live/on farm and final products. Understanding of catfish fillet redness is being studied with the vision of helping develop industry guidelines to enhance filet color uniformity or predict filet color. Antimicrobials in the form of bacteriophages or naturally-derived were tested against pathogens in vitro and in seafood matrices with good results. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were found for each of the compounds or for those used in a mix. Ready-to-eat catfish products were developed. These could increase the offer of value-added catfish products in the market, expanding the industry competitiveness edge. These research projects will play a role in assuring safe, high-quality food products to consumers and will be important to maintaining viable aquaculture and seafood industries in the U.S.


4. Accomplishments


Review Publications
Bradley, E.M., Williams, B., Schilling, W., Coggins, P., Crist, C., Yoder, S.W. 2011. Effects of sodium lactate and acetic acid derivatives on the quality and sensory characteristics of hot-boned pork sausage patties. Meat Science. 88:145-150.

Soni, K., Nannapaneni, R. 2010. Bacteriophage significantly reduces Listeria monocytogenes on raw salmon fillet tissue. Journal of Food Protection. 73:32-38.

Donaldson, J.B., Nanduri, B., Pittman, J., Givaruangsawar, S., Burgess, S.C., Lawrence, M.L. 2011. Proteomic expression profiles of virulent and avirulent strains of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from macrophages. Journal of Proteomics. 74(10):1906-1917.

Steel, C.L., Donaldson, J.R., Paul, D., Barnes, M.M., Burgess, S.C., Arick, T., Bridges, S.M., Lawrence, M.L. 2011. Genome sequesnce of lineage III Listeria monocytogenes strain HCC23. Journal of Bacteriology. 193:3679-3680.

Kim, T., Silva, J.L., Jung, Y. 2010. Enhanced functional properties of tannic acid after thermal hydrolysis. Food Chemistry. 126:116-120.

Soni, K., Nannapaneni, R., Tasara, T. 2011. The contribution of transcriptomic and proteomic analysis in elucidating stress adaptation responses of Listeria monocytogenes. Foodborne Pathogens and Disease. 8:842-852.

Soni, K., Nannapaneni, R., Hagens, S. 2010. Reduction of Listeria monocytogenes on the surface of fresh channel catfish fillets by bacteriophage listex P100. Foodborne Pathogens and Disease. 7:427-434.

Kin, S., Schilling, W., Smith, B.S., Silva, J., Kim, T., Pham, A. 2011. Potassium acetate and potassium lactate enhance the microbiological and physical properties of marinated catfish fillets. Journal of Food Science. 76(4):5242-5250.

Soni, K., Nannapaneni, R., Tasara, T. 2011. An overview of stress response proteomes in Listeria monocytogenes. Agriculture, Food and Analytical Bacteriology. 1:66-85.

Last Modified: 10/20/2017
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