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ARS Home » Plains Area » Lubbock, Texas » Cropping Systems Research Laboratory » Plant Stress and Germplasm Development Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #99115

Title: COTTON ROOT HEALTH WORK GROUP: USE OF STABILITY ANALYSIS TO EVALUATE BELT- WIDE DATA BASE

Author
item McMichael, Bobbie
item BOWMAN, RANDY
item BATSON, BILL
item BLASINGAME, DON
item COLYER, PAT
item EDIMISTEN, KEITH
item ROBERTS, BRUCE
item SUMNER, DON

Submitted to: National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/31/1999
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Seedling disease can have a significant impact on the development of a healthy cotton root system and in turn influence overall plant produc- tivity. The objectives of the Cotton Root Health Work Group are to evaluate the influence of seedling disease on the health of the cotton root system and to determine the impact of root health on yield and productivity. Seven nlocations representing diverse environments across the Cotton Belt and utilizing several different disciplines are being used in the study. Core treatments ranging from no seed treatment to commercial seed treatment with in-furrow applications of TSX (Terrachlor Super-X) and Temik in various combinations were established at each location. Evaluations of stand counts, root and hypocotyl disease indices, root growth and distribution by depth, fruiting, yield and fiber quality were conducted according to preestablished protocol. Stability analysis was utilized to analyze the information from the seven locations over three growing seasons. The results from three growing seasons indicated a significantly lower population density for the black seed control across all environments when compared to the other treatments with in-furrow fungicide added. The analysis of the root growth data indicated a significantly higher root distribution at the 0-10 cm depth for the commercial seed treatment with TSX and Temik applied in-furrow than for the other treatments, suggesting a healthier root system at this growth stage. There was also no significant difference in lint yields between the treatments across all environments, suggesting that the indeterminate growth habit of cotton, coupled with the observations that a critical population density was not reached, resulted in no yield differences due to plant compensation in fruiting.