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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Wapato, Washington » Temperate Tree Fruit and Vegetable Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #391627

Research Project: New Technologies and Strategies for Managing Emerging Insect Pests and Insect Transmitted Pathogens of Potatoes

Location: Temperate Tree Fruit and Vegetable Research

Title: A comprehensive review of zebra chip disease in potato and its management through breeding for resistance/tolerance to Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum and its insect vector

Author
item PRAGER, SEAN - University Of Saskatchewan
item COHEN, ABIGAIL - University Of Saskatchewan
item Cooper, Rodney - William
item Novy, Richard - Rich
item RASHED, ARASH - University Of Idaho
item WENNINGER, ERIK - University Of Idaho
item Wallis, Christopher

Submitted to: Pest Management Science
Publication Type: Review Article
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/8/2022
Publication Date: 4/12/2022
Citation: Prager, S., Cohen, A., Cooper, W.R., Novy, R.G., Rashed, A., Wenninger, E., Wallis, C.M. 2022. A comprehensive review of zebra chip disease in potato and its management through breeding for resistance/tolerance to Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum and its insect vector. Pest Management Science. https://doi.org/10.1002/ps.6913.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/ps.6913

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Zebra Chip disease (ZC), associated with the plant pathogenic bacterium “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” (psyllaurous) (CLso), is a major threat to global potato production. In addition to yield loss, CLso infection causes discoloration in the tubers rendering them unmarketable. CLso is transmitted by the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Šulc) (Hemiptera: Triozidae). ZC is managed by prophylactic insecticides applications to control the vector, which is costly and carries environmental and human health risks. Given the expense, difficulty, and unsustainability of managing vector-borne diseases with insecticides, screening and breeding efforts were undertaken to identify sources of resistance to CLso and develop varieties that are resistant or tolerant to CLso and/or potato psyllids. These efforts include field and laboratory evaluations of non-cultivated germplasm and cultivars, studies of tubers in cold storage, detailed quantifications of biochemical responses to infection with CLso, possible mechanisms underlying insect resistance, and traditional examination of potato quality following infections. This review provides a brief history of ZC and potato psyllid, provides a summary of currently available tools to manage ZC, and provides a comprehensive review of work on ZC and potato psyllids within the context of potato breeding and examines breeding within the greater context of IPM strategies.