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ARS Home » Plains Area » College Station, Texas » Southern Plains Agricultural Research Center » Crop Germplasm Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #389004

Research Project: Identification of Resistance in Sorghum to Fungal Pathogens and Characterization of Pathogen Population Structure

Location: Crop Germplasm Research

Title: Response of sorghum accessions from three African countries to anthracnose, grain mould, and rust

Author
item Prom, Louis
item Cuevas, Hugo
item AHN, EZEKIEL - TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY
item ISAKEIT, THOMAS - TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY
item MAGILL, CLINT - TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Plant Pathology Journal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/12/2021
Publication Date: 1/15/2022
Citation: Prom, L.K., Cuevas, H.E., Ahn, E., Isakeit, T., Magill, C. 2022. Response of sorghum accessions from three African countries to anthracnose, grain mould, and rust. Plant Pathology Journal. 21(1):12-23. https://doi.org/10.3923/PPJ.2022.12.23.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3923/PPJ.2022.12.23

Interpretive Summary: Sorghum is one of the most important crops in the world, especially in the tropics; however, the crop is affected by a number of fungal diseases, causing millions of dollars in crop loss every year. A total of 179 accessions were evaluated for germination rate and resistance to anthracnose, grain mold, and rust during the 2017 and 2018 growing seasons. Results showed that a number of accessions were resistant to anthracnose and rust, while two accessions PI514318 and PI514538 were resistant to the three diseases. Significant associations between seed germination rates and the three diseases were observed. This work is significant because the two identified accessions may be useful in breeding programs to develop anthracnose, grain mold, and rust resistant lines or hybrids.

Technical Abstract: Sorghum is one of the most indispensable crops, especially in the drier tropics where many millions of people rely on it for their daily calorie intake. However, the crop is hampered by several biotic stresses, causing annual economic losses estimated in hundreds of millions of dollars. A total of 179 accessions from Ethiopia, Gambia, and Senegal were evaluated for resistance to anthracnose, grain mold, and rust during the 2017 and 2018 growing seasons. Out of the 179 accessions evaluated, 138 were resistant to anthracnose. Among these anthracnose resistant accessions, 41 accessions, including PI276832, PI534001, PI533903, and PI665159 were also resistant to Puccinia purpurea, which causes rust. Three accessions (PI514411, PI514318 and PI514538) out of the 138 anthracnose resistant accessions were also resistant to grain mold. Two accessions (PI514318 and PI514538) from Senegal were resistant to all three diseases. Among the anthracnose resistant accessions, 20 recorded 90% or above germination rate. Germination rate was correlated with the sorghum responses to the three diseases; a positive correlation was found between germination rate and severity to rust, while negative correlations were detected between germination rate and severities to anthracnose and grain mold. The work is significant because it has identified two accessions that are resistant to anthracnose, grain mold, and rust. The identified accessions may be useful in breeding programs to introgress the resistance genes they possess into elite or parental lines beyond Puerto Rico.