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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » Forage Seed and Cereal Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #370981

Research Project: Breeding, Genomics, and Integrated Pest Management to Enhance Sustainability of U.S. Hop Production and Competitiveness in Global Markets

Location: Forage Seed and Cereal Research

Title: Evaluation of fungicides for hop powdery mildew, study 2, Granger, Washington, 2019

Author
item MASSIE, STEPHEN - Washington Hop Commission
item CLAASSEN, BRIANA - Oregon State University
item Gent, David - Dave

Submitted to: Plant Disease Management Reports
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/10/2020
Publication Date: 3/9/2020
Citation: Massie, S.T., Claassen, B.J., Gent, D.H. 2020. Evaluation of fungicides for hop powdery mildew, study 2, Granger, Washington, 2019. Plant Disease Management Reports. 14:V051. https://doi.org/10.1094/PDMR14.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1094/PDMR14

Interpretive Summary: The disease powdery mildew is an ongoing management challenge for hop producers. The organisms that cause powdery mildew diseases reproduce rapidly and have a propensity to develop resistance to fungicides and adapt to innate resistance in host plants. Therefore, there is a need to identify new means of disease control to ensure the disease can be managed in the long-term. This research was conducted to quantify disease suppression and develop overall management programs for the disease using newly registered, experimental, and reduced-risk fungicides. A potentially new mode of action was identified that can contribute to management of the disease.

Technical Abstract: Adaptation of powdery mildew pathogens to fungicides and host resistance is well documented. Sustainable disease management requires a broad set of crop protection tools to enable effective resistance management. This research was conducted to quantify disease suppression and develop overall management programs for the disease using newly registered, experimental, and reduced-risk fungicides. A potentially new mode of action of was identified that can contribute to management of the disease.