Skip to main content
ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » Horticultural Crops Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #369140

Research Project: Improving the Quality of Grapes, Other Fruits, and their Products through Agricultural Management

Location: Horticultural Crops Research

Title: First report of grapevine red blotch virus in Idaho grapevines

Author
item THOMPSON, BRANDON - University Of Idaho
item EID, SAHAR - University Of Idaho
item VANDER POL, DALTON - University Of Idaho
item Lee, Jungmin
item KARASEV, ALEXANDER - University Of Idaho

Submitted to: Plant Disease
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/5/2019
Publication Date: 12/10/2019
Citation: Thompson, B., Eid, S., Vander Pol, D., Lee, J., Karasev, A.V. 2019. First report of grapevine red blotch virus in Idaho grapevines. Plant Disease. 103(10):2704. https://doi.org/10.1094/PDIS-04-19-0780-PDN.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1094/PDIS-04-19-0780-PDN

Interpretive Summary: This paper is the first report on the presence of Grapevine Red Blotch Virus (GRBV) in Idaho commercial vineyards. Multi-years of sampling and testing for GRBV indicate the spread of this virus is limited. This virus was highly likely introduced to Idaho by the importation of GRBV infected planting materials. Though Idaho’s winegrape industry is fairly young in comparison to the prominent US growing regions of California, Washington, Oregon, and New York, grapevine viruses are a concern in all viticulture regions. While some grapevine viruses are detrimental to grapevine health, crop load ratio, fruit characteristics, and ultimately to wine quality, others cause only minor issues.

Technical Abstract: Wine grape production in Idaho occurs on approximately 1,300 acres (planted acreage), predominately Canyon County in the Southwest and Nez Perce County in the Northwest. A small survey of wine grapes was conducted in these two counties of Idaho for the presence of GRBV (Grapevine Red Blotch Virus). In 2014, 58 samples of red wine grape cultivars were collected; the following year the 58 samples were again taken plus an additional 46 samples, for a 2015 total of 104 vines sampled. Grapevines were selected based on visual signs of leaf reddening, and then confirmed by PCR using GRBV-specific primers. GRBV was found in three Idaho vineyards, and in cultivars of Merlot, Syrah, and Petite Sirah. This is the first report on the presence of GRBV in Idaho commercial vineyards.