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ARS Home » Plains Area » Kerrville, Texas » Knipling-Bushland U.S. Livestock Insects Research Laboratory » LAPRU » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #365771

Research Project: Cattle Fever Tick Control and Eradication

Location: Livestock Arthropod Pests Research

Title: Enhanced biosurveillance of high-consequence invasive pests: Southern cattle fever ticks, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, on livestock and wildlife

Author
item WANG, HSIAO-HSUAN - Texas A&M University
item GRANT, WILLIAM - Texas A&M University
item TEEL, PETE - Texas A&M University
item Lohmeyer, Kimberly - Kim
item Perez De Leon, Adalberto - Beto

Submitted to: Parasites & Vectors
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/16/2020
Publication Date: 9/23/2020
Citation: Wang, H., Grant, W.E., Teel, P.D., Lohmeyer, K.H., Perez De Leon, A.A. 2020. Enhanced biosurveillance of high-consequence invasive pests: Southern cattle fever ticks, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, on livestock and wildlife. Parasites & Vectors. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13071-020-04366-x.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13071-020-04366-x

Interpretive Summary: Some tick species are invasive and of high consequence to public and veterinary health. Socioeconomic development of rural parts of the U.S. was enabled partly through the eradication by 1943 of cattle fever ticks (CFT). CFT remain a real and present threat to U.S. cattle production because they are established in Mexico. Livestock-wildlife interactions in the Permanent Quarantine Zone (PQZ) established by the century-old Cattle Fever Tick Eradication Program (CFTEP) in south Texas endanger its operations. Here, we simulated interactions between cattle, white tailed deer (WTD), and nilgai antelope to assess the risk for CFT infestations in the PQZ and beyond. Our results documented the use of enhanced biosurveillance simulation tools to mitigate risk and enhance current control strategies for use in the operations of area-wide tick management programs like the CFTEP through integrated tactics for CFT suppression.

Technical Abstract: Some tick species are invasive and of high consequence to public and veterinary health. Socioeconomic development of rural parts of the U.S. was enabled partly through the eradication by 1943 of cattle fever ticks (CFT, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus and R. (B.) microplus). CFT remain a real and present threat to U.S. animal agriculture because they are established in Mexico. Livestock-wildlife interactions in the Permanent Quarantine Zone (PQZ) established by the century-old Cattle Fever Tick Eradication Program (CFTEP) in south Texas endanger its operations. Here, we simulated interactions between cattle, white tailed deer (WTD, Odocoileus virginianus), and nilgai (Boselaphus tragocamelus) to assess the risk for CFT infestations across the pathogenic landscape in the PQZ and beyond. Infestations in nilgai augment CFT refugia enabled by WTD and promote pest persistence across the landscape and cattle parasitism. Our results documented the utility of enhanced biosurveillance using simulation tools to mitigate risk and enhance operations of area-wide tick management programs like the CFTEP through integrated tactics for CFT suppression.