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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » Horticultural Crops Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #360197

Research Project: Development of Knowledge-based Approaches for Disease Management in Small Fruit and Nursery Crops

Location: Horticultural Crops Research

Title: How low can they go? Plant-parasitic nematodes in a Washington vineyard

Author
item EAST, K - Washington State University
item MOYER, M - Washington State University
item MADDEN, N - Vineyard Soil Technologies
item Zasada, Inga

Submitted to: Catalyst: Discovery into Practice
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/2/2019
Publication Date: 7/18/2019
Citation: East, K.E., Moyer, M.M., Madden, N.M., Zasada, I.A. 2019. How low can they go? Plant-parasitic nematodes in a Washington vineyard. Catalyst: Discovery into Practice. 3(1):31-36. https://doi.org/10.5344/catalyst.2019.19001.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5344/catalyst.2019.19001

Interpretive Summary: Plant-parasitic nematodes are microscopic roundworms that feed on the roots of plants and reduce plant health and yields. In Washington State vineyards there are two plant-parasitic nematodes of concern the northern root-knot nematode Meloidogyne hapla and the dagger nematode Xiphinema spp. In this study, the distribution of these two nematodes was mapped in a Washington State wine grape vineyard slated for replanting. It was discovered that the northern root-knot nematode had a distinctly different soil distribution pattern relative to dagger nematode. The northern root-knot nematode was concentrated near the vine rows, and in the upper 24 inches of the soil profile, reflective of its life strategy where association with host fine roots and areas of moisture are essential. Dagger nematode was present at all distances from the vine row and was found at depths up to 48 inches. This nematode’s widespread distribution within the vineyard demonstrates that it can readily survive on hosts other than grape and can parasitize additional types of roots compared to northern root-knot nematode. Knowing how these nematodes are spatially distributed in soil can improve how growers implement chemical and cultural management strategies.

Technical Abstract: The distribution of two plant-parasitic nematode species, the northern root-knot nematode Meloidogyne hapla and the dagger nematode Xiphinema spp., were mapped in a Washington State wine grape vineyard slated for replanting. These nematode species can reduce vineyard longevity and weaken or kill young vines. Knowing how these nematodes are spatially distributed in soil can improve how we implement chemical and cultural management strategies. It was discovered that the Northern root-knot nematode had a distinctly different soil distribution pattern relative to dagger nematode. Northern root-knot nematode was concentrated near the vine rows, and in the upper 24 inches of the soil profile, reflective of its life strategy where association with host fine roots and areas of moisture are essential. Dagger nematode was present at all distances from the vine row and was found at depths up to 48 inches. This nematode’s widespread distribution demonstrates that it can readily survive on hosts other than grape and can parasitize additional types of roots compared to northern root-knot nematode.