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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Wapato, Washington » Temperate Tree Fruit and Vegetable Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #354942

Research Project: New Technologies and Strategies to Manage the Changing Pest Complex on Temperate Fruit Trees

Location: Temperate Tree Fruit and Vegetable Research

Title: Postharvest insects and their control

Author
item Neven, Lisa
item YAHIA, ALHADI - AUTONOMOUS UNIVERSITY OF QUERETARO
item JONES, ROBERT - AUTONOMOUS UNIVERSITY OF QUERETARO

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/17/2019
Publication Date: 10/31/2019
Citation: Neven, L.G., Yahia, A.M., Jones, R.W. 2019. Postharvest insects and their control. Book Chapter. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-813276-0.00016-X.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-813276-0.00016-X

Interpretive Summary: Insects may significantly damage produce, and facilitate the introduction of pathogens that cause further losses and decay. The mere presence of insects of quarantine importance on produce can greatly reduce the possible markets for exportation if these insects are absent from the country or region importing the fruits or vegetables. Researchers at the USDA-ARS laboratory in Wapato, WA collaborated with scientists at the Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro to develop a book chapter reviewing the major groups of postharvest pests and their symptoms, together with an understanding of the methods to prevent and control these organisms is an essential component in the management practices of postharvest fruit and vegetables. This chapter will be part of a text book for training the next generation of postharvest quarantine specialists.

Technical Abstract: Approximately one half of the one million known insect species feed on plants. With such an enormous diversity, it is not surprising that plant feeding insects are one of the most vexing and complex problems in managing postharvest fruits and vegetables. Insects may significantly damage produce, and facilitate the introduction of pathogens that cause further losses and decay. The mere presence of insects of quarantine importance on produce can greatly reduce the possible markets for exportation if these insects are absent from the country or region importing the fruits or vegetables. The ability to identify major groups of postharvest pests and their symptoms, together with an understanding of the methods to prevent and control these organisms is an essential component in the management practices of postharvest fruit and vegetables.