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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Animal Biosciences & Biotechnology Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #354633

Research Project: Non-antibiotic Strategies to Control Enteric Diseases of Poultry

Location: Animal Biosciences & Biotechnology Laboratory

Title: Comparison of pathogenicity of several Clostridium perfringens strains with Eimeria maxima co-infection in inducing necrotic enteritis lesions in broiler chickens

Author
item Li, Charles
item Liu, Liheng - Jiangxi Agricultural University
item Yan, Xianghe
item Lillehoj, Hyun
item Sun, Zhifeng - US Department Of Agriculture (USDA)
item Zhao, Hongyan - Yangzhou University
item Xianyu, Zhezi - University Of Delaware
item Lee, Youngsub - US Department Of Agriculture (USDA)

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/1/2018
Publication Date: 7/10/2018
Citation: Li, C.Z., Liu, L., Yan, X., Lillehoj, H.S., Sun, Z., Zhao, H., Xianyu, Z., Lee, Y. 2018. Comparison of pathogenicity of several Clostridium perfringens strains with Eimeria maxima co-infection in inducing necrotic enteritis lesions in broiler chickens. Meeting Abstract. P19.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Necrotic enteritis (NE) and coccidiosis, caused by Clostridium perfringens (CP) Type A strains and Eimeria spp., are two important enteric infectious diseases in poultry, responsible for the annual loss of $ 6 and 3 billions to worldwide poultry industry, respectively. Coccidiosis is a predisposing factor for NE induction. The virulence of CP strains is important in inducing NE, but less elucidated in dual infections. In this study, five strains from different source and genetic background, N11 (isolate from healthy chicken intestine), Strain 13 (natural isolate from soil), SM101 (isolate from food poisoning), Del1 (field netB+ CP strain isolate from NE outbreak in a chicken farm) and Tpel 17 (field netB+tpel+ CP strain isolate from NE outbreak in a chicken farm) were compared in the pathogenicity when co-infected with 5000 oocytes of Eimeria maxima (EM) in 2-wk-old broiler chickens. In the birds infected by Eimeria followed by 2 consecutive oral administration of CP (Em/2x CP), 40% and 10% mortalities were observed in the groups of Eimeria / 2x CP (Tpel 17), and Eimeria /2x CP (Del1) at Day 2 post CP infection, respectively. No mortality was observed in Eimeria alone or CP alone groups. In the birds infected with Eimeria followed by one time dosing of CP (EM/1x CP), only the group of EM/1x CP (Tpel 17) had a mortality of 25%, and had broad and severe lesions. In all the groups of EM/CP dual infections, lesions were all observed, no matter the source of these strains. That studies suggested that the Eimeria prei-infection may destroy the intestine epithelial integrity as a predisposing factor, and provide necessary conditions for C. perfringens outgrowth. Strain with NetB and Tpel toxins (Tpel 17) is a very virulent strain with least relative body weight gain, causes very severe lesions, and should be used as a good challenge strain when co-infected with Eimeria maxima in studies of CP pathogenesis or alternatives to antibiotics.