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ARS Home » Plains Area » College Station, Texas » Southern Plains Agricultural Research Center » Aerial Application Technology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #353615

Research Project: Aerial Application Technology for Sustainable Crop Production

Location: Aerial Application Technology Research

Title: Establishing reference nozzles for classification of aerial application spray technologies

Author
item Fritz, Bradley - Brad
item HOFFMANN, WESLEY - Retired ARS Employee

Submitted to: International Journal of Precision Agricultural Aviation (IJPAA)
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/25/2018
Publication Date: 12/30/2018
Citation: Fritz, B.K., Hoffmann, W.C. 2018. Establishing reference nozzles for classification of aerial application spray technologies. International Journal of Precision Agricultural Aviation (IJPAA). 1(1):10-14. https://doi.org/10.33440/j.ijpaa.20180101.0003.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.33440/j.ijpaa.20180101.0003

Interpretive Summary: Measurement of droplet size from agricultural spray systems can be highly variable and heavily influenced by measurement systems and methods. Past efforts in developing a series of nozzles that are used to define relative droplet size classes across the wide range typical to agricultural spray applications have largely ignored aerial application conditions. With a new standard being published that is specific to aerial spray systems there is a need to develop dedicated reference nozzles sets for use by entities conducting aerial application droplet size research. To support the use of this standard, multiple sets of dedicated droplet size matched nozzles were developed that will allow for increased data quality across differing research facilities helping to reduce varying, and potentially conflicting data, ultimately providing for more consistent and accurate guidance to applicators.

Technical Abstract: Measurement of droplet size from agricultural spray nozzles can be highly variable and heavily influenced by measurement systems, methods and physical difference in measurement facilities. Past efforts have developed a series of nozzles and operational pressure pairings that are used to define relative droplet size classes across the wide range of sizes typical in agrochemical applications. Until recently, the developed classification standards were only application non-aerial spray technologies, as the paired nozzle and pressures used did not account for the secondary breakup resulting from high airspeed typical to agricultural aircraft. A new standard has addressed this issue, with dedicated nozzle/spray pressure pairs designed to generate similar classification boundaries to current standards while operating in high airspeed conditions. To support the application of this standard, multiple sets of dedicated droplet size matched nozzles were developed.