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ARS Home » Plains Area » Lubbock, Texas » Cropping Systems Research Laboratory » Plant Stress and Germplasm Development Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #353339

Research Project: Enhancing Plant Resistance to Water-Deficit and Thermal Stresses in Economically Important Crops

Location: Plant Stress and Germplasm Development Research

Title: Irrigation’s effect and applied selection on the fiber quality of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) treated upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

Author
item Witt, Travis
item Ulloa, Mauricio
item Pelletier, Mathew
item Mendu, Venugopal - Texas Tech University
item Ritchie, Glen - Texas Tech University

Submitted to: Journal of Cotton Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/20/2018
Publication Date: 12/26/2018
Citation: Witt, T.W., Ulloa, M., Pelletier, M.G., Mendu, V., Ritchie, G.L. 2018. Irrigation’s effect and applied selection on the fiber quality of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) treated upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). Journal of Cotton Research. 1:17. https://doi.org/10.1186/s42397-018-0016-8.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/s42397-018-0016-8

Interpretive Summary: Producing rainfed cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) with high fiber quality has traditionally been difficult in the Texas High Plains because of extended periods of inadequate rainfall during sensitive boll developmental stages. Traditional plant breeding techniques have successfully improved the fiber quality of cotton; however, little is known about the effect of water deficit or stress environments on this fiber quality. Therefore, cotton entries with higher fiber quality were analyzed under diverse irrigation regimes. Analyses from these cotton entries showed significant improvement for fiber traits (micronaire, length, strength, uniformity, and elongation) with some entries having excellent fiber quality under diverse irrigation-regimes. Some of these entries are being considered for germplasm release and could be useful for improving the fiber quality of cotton under water limited conditions, thereby helping to ensure the long-term survival of the cotton industry on the Texas High Plains.

Technical Abstract: Producing rainfed cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) with high fiber quality has traditionally been difficult in the Texas High Plains because of extended periods of inadequate rainfall during sensitive boll developmental stages. Traditional plant breeding techniques have successfully improved the fiber quality of cotton; however, little is known about the effect of water deficit or stress environments on this fiber quality. Therefore, cotton entries with higher fiber quality were analyzed under diverse irrigation regimes. Analyses from these cotton entries showed significant improvement for fiber traits (micronaire, length, strength, uniformity, and elongation) with some entries having excellent fiber quality under diverse irrigation-regimes. Some of these entries are being considered for germplasm release and could be useful for improving the fiber quality of cotton under water limited conditions, thereby helping to ensure the long-term survival of the cotton industry on the Texas High Plains.