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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Parlier, California » San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Sciences Center » Crop Diseases, Pests and Genetics Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #352344

Research Project: Identification of Novel Management Strategies for Key Pests and Pathogens of Grapevine with Emphasis on the Xylella Fastidiosa Pathosystem

Location: Crop Diseases, Pests and Genetics Research

Title: Working towards developing potato tolerance of zebra chip disease: a food science perspective

Author
item Wallis, Christopher
item Trumble, John - University Of California

Submitted to: Potato Grower
Publication Type: Trade Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/15/2017
Publication Date: 1/1/2018
Citation: Wallis, C.M., Trumble, J.T. 2018. Working towards developing potato tolerance of zebra chip disease: a food science perspective. Potato Grower. 47:78-79.

Interpretive Summary: Potato zebra chip, caused by the bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (Lso), is a major concern for potato growers worldwide. Although zebra chip is currently managed by limiting populations of potato psyllid vectors that can spread Lso, long term management must rely on the development of zebra chip-resistant or Lso-tolerant potato cultivars. Large scale zebra chip resistance screening projects have been conducted and identified a handful of promising Lso-tolerant breeding lines. Common to these Lso-tolerant breeding lines is the lack of large-scale physiological changes upon infection that are strongly associated with symptom development. Breeders are currently using these identified Lso-tolerant breeding lines to make new commercial cultivars that will be available to potato growers to mitigate the threat of zebra chip disease.

Technical Abstract: Potato zebra chip is a major threat to worldwide potato production and is caused by ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (Lso), which is vectored by potato psyllids. Albeit control can be achieved by use of insecticides to limit psyllid populations and therefore Lso spread, the recent development of pesticide- resistant psyllids has prompted an emphasis on developing zebra chip resistant or Lso-tolerant potato cultivars. Screening of existing breeding materials has identified Lso tolerance in a dozen or so breeding lines. Common in all of these Lso-tolerant breeding lines is the lack of large-scale physiological changes upon infection that consistently have been associated with the development of zebra chip symptoms. These Lso-tolerant breeding lines are now being advanced to develop commercial potato cultivars available to growers for whom zebra chip disease is a major concern.