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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Parlier, California » San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Sciences Center » Crop Diseases, Pests and Genetics Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #348320

Research Project: Identification of Novel Management Strategies for Key Pests and Pathogens of Grapevine with Emphasis on the Xylella Fastidiosa Pathosystem

Location: Crop Diseases, Pests and Genetics Research

Title: Population diversity of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) in China based on whole mitochondrial genome sequences

Author
item Wu, F - South China Agricultural University
item Jiang, H - South China Agricultural University
item Andrew, B - Western Sydney University
item Holford, P - Western Sydney University
item Chen, Jianchi
item Wallis, Christopher
item Zheng, Z - South China Agricultural University
item Deng, X - South China Agricultural University
item Cen, Y - South China Agricultural University

Submitted to: Pest Management Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/9/2018
Publication Date: 4/24/2018
Citation: Wu, F., Jiang, H., Andrew, B., Holford, P., Chen, J., Wallis, C.M., Zheng, Z., Deng, X., Cen, Y. 2018. Population diversity of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) in China based on whole mitochondrial genome sequences. Pest Management Science. https://doi.org/10.1002/ps.5044.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/ps.5044

Interpretive Summary: Asian citrus psyllid (ACP, Diaphorina citri) transmits the pathogen that causes citrus Huanglongbing (HLB), a highly destructive disease affecting citrus production worldwide. HLB and ACP have been in China for over a hundred years, and were found in the United States ten years ago. Effective control of HLB relies on comprehensive knowledge of vector ecology and biology including population diversity of ACP. In this study, ACP were collected from China and south/southeastern Asia. ACP population diversity was studied through the analyses of mitochondrial genome sequences, a common technique for studying insect populations. Three major mitochondrial groups (MGs) were found: MG1, present in southwestern China with elevations greater than 1,000 meters; MG2, present in southeastern China and southeastern Asia (Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Vietnam) with elevation less than 180 meters; and MG3, present in the United States and Pakistan. The information will facilitate current efforts in HLB management, in particular how the vector ACP is controlled.

Technical Abstract: BACKGROUND: Diaphorina citri (Asian citrus psyllid, ACP) transmits “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus”, an unculturable alpha-proteobacterium associated with citrus Huanglongbing (HLB). ACP has been reported in 11 provinces/regions in China, yet its population diversity remains unclear. In this study, ACP population diversity in China was evaluated using representative whole mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequences. Additional mitogenome sequences outside China also were acquired and evaluated. RESULT: Sizes of the 27 ACP mitogenome sequences ranged from 14,986 to 15,030 bp. Along with three previously published ACP mitogenome sequences, the 30 sequences formed three major mitochondrial groups (MGs): MG1, present in southwestern China and occurring at elevations above 1,000 meters; MG2, present in southeastern China and southeastern Asia (Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Vietnam) and occurring at elevations below 180 meters; and MG3, present in the USA and Pakistan. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in five genes (cox2, atp8, nad3, nad1 and rrnL) accounted for much of the diversity among the three MGs, with rrnL most variable. Secondary structure of trnAsn transcript also effectively differentiated the three MGs. CONCLUSION: Mitogenome sequence analyses revealed two major phylogenetic groups of ACP present in China, as well as a possible distinct group present in Pakistan and the United States. This information could have significant implication to current HLB management, specifically relating to the worldwide spread of ACP.