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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » Horticultural Crops Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #347575

Research Project: Genetic Improvement and Virus Management of Small Fruit Crops

Location: Horticultural Crops Research

Title: Performance of an elite, hybrid family of a northern × southern highbush cross (‘Draper’ × ‘Jewel’)

Author
item Hancock, James - Michigan State University
item Olmstead, James - Driscoll'S
item Itle, Rachel - University Of Florida
item Callow, Peter - Michigan State University
item Neils-kraft, Stuart - Michigan State University
item Wheeler, Edmund - Berry Blue, Llc
item Mangandi, Jozer - Berry Blue, Llc
item Sooriyapathirana, Suneth - University Of Florida
item Rowland, Lisa
item Mackey, Theodore - Ted
item Bassil, Nahla
item Finn, Chad

Submitted to: Euphytica
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/30/2018
Publication Date: 5/12/2018
Citation: Hancock, J.F., Olmstead, J.W., Itle, R.A., Callow, P.W., Neils-Kraft, S.P., Wheeler, E.J., Mangandi, J., Sooriyapathirana, S.S., Rowland, L.J., Mackey, T.A., Bassil, N.V., Finn, C.E. 2018. Performance of an elite, hybrid family of a northern × southern highbush cross (‘Draper’ × ‘Jewel’). Euphytica. 214:95. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10681-018-2173-8.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10681-018-2173-8

Interpretive Summary: A family of the cross of the northern highbush blueberry ‘Draper’ × the southern highbush ‘Jewel’ (D×J) was propagated planted in in Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Michigan (MI) and Oregon (OR) where the fruiting and plant traits were evaluated. In addition, a controlled greenhouse study was conducted on these progenies to estimate their chilling requirements. Significant levels of genotypic variability were observed for all the traits, and the majority showed significant location and genotype × environmental interactions. Most of these traits were normally distributed across genotypes. There was a significant G × E effect on days to early green tip, floral bud break and full bloom. Significant correlations were observed between all the developmental rates except between floral bud break and the days to full flowering and first blue fruit. Most individuals were severely damaged by winter cold in MI, although a few showed good tolerance. Significant location effects were observed for pH, titratable acidity, soluble solids and SS/TA. There were significant interactions between genotype and environment for all the fruit quality traits except for fruit scar, firmness, anthocyanin content and % juice. Two or three individuals were identified at each location that had high yields, were very early or late ripening and had excellent overall fruit quality. There were significant levels of genotypic, environmental (chilling hours) and G × E interaction among vegetative and floral buds for numbers of buds per shoot, percentage that developed and their developmental rate. The chilling requirement of highbush blueberry appears to be regulated polygenically as the D×J family segregated normally. On average, genotypes did more poorly at 250 and 350 chilling hours than the other chilling treatments. The use of the superior parents identified herein can hopefully be facilitated by the identification of DNA markers for horticulturally important traits.

Technical Abstract: A family of the cross of the northern highbush blueberry ‘Draper’ × the southern highbush ‘Jewel’ (D×J) was propagated and phenotyped for fruit and plant traits for two years in the field in Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Michigan (MI) and Oregon (OR). In addition, a controlled greenhouse study was conducted on these progenies to estimate their chilling requirements. Significant levels of genotypic variability were observed for all the traits, and the majority showed significant location and genotype × environmental interactions. Most of these traits were normally distributed across genotypes. There was a significant G × E effect on days to early green tip, floral bud break and full bloom. Significant correlations were observed between all the developmental rates except between floral bud break and the days to full flowering and first blue fruit. Most individuals were severely damaged by winter cold in MI, although a few showed good tolerance. Significant location effects were observed for pH, titratable acidity, soluble solids and SS/TA. There were significant interactions between genotype and environment for all the fruit quality traits except for fruit scar, firmness, anthocyanin content and % juice. Two or three individuals were identified at each location that had high yields, were very early or late ripening and had excellent overall fruit quality. There were significant levels of genotypic, environmental (chilling hours) and G × E interaction among vegetative and floral buds for numbers of buds per shoot, percentage that developed and their developmental rate. The chilling requirement of highbush blueberry appears to be regulated polygenically as the D×J family segregated normally. On average, genotypes did more poorly at 250 and 350 chilling hours than the other chilling treatments.