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ARS Home » Plains Area » Lubbock, Texas » Cropping Systems Research Laboratory » Plant Stress and Germplasm Development Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #347555

Research Project: Genetic Enhancement of Sorghum as a Versatile Crop

Location: Plant Stress and Germplasm Development Research

Title: Early planting and cold resiliency in sorghum seed-to-seed

Author
item Emendack, Yves
item Burke, John
item Sanchez, Jacobo
item Echevarria Laza, Haydee
item Hayes, Chad
item Burow, Gloria
item Xin, Zhanguo

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/19/2017
Publication Date: 4/9/2018
Citation: Emendack, Y., Burke, J.J., Sanchez, J., Echevarria Laza, H.J., Hayes, C.M., Burow, G.B., Xin, Z. 2018. Early planting and cold resiliency in sorghum seed-to-seed [abstract]. Food, Feed and Fuel in a rapidly changing world. Paper No. 001.

Interpretive Summary: The physiological and agro-morphological responses of sorghum grown at three planting dates (early; April 1st, mid-early; May 1st, and normal; June 1st) in West Texas were characterized from seedling to maturity (seed-to-seed) using diverse lines and hybrids selected for cold tolerance at the early vegetative stage. These were evaluated in comparison with standard commercial cold tolerant hybrids and cold susceptible checks. Genotypic variability for agro-physiological traits was observed within and across planting dates during seedling to the early developmental stages, and at maturity. All previously selected lines and hybrids for cold tolerance performed better than the cold susceptible checks. Some hybrids and lines outperformed standard commercial cold tolerant checks.

Technical Abstract: These responses limit sorghum production in high altitudes, latitudes, and in regions with sub-optimal temperatures during germination, emergence, and early growth stages. Genetic variability for cold tolerance exists in sorghum and has been evaluated by both early planting in the field and controlled temperature conditions. Cold tolerance in sorghum has been measured by various characteristics, i.e. germination, emergence, vigor, and seedling growth under sub-optimal temperatures. The physiological and agro-morphological responses of sorghum grown at three planting dates (early; April 1st, mid-early; May 1st, and normal; June 1st) in West Texas were characterized from seedling to maturity (seed-to-seed) using diverse lines and hybrids selected for cold tolerance at the early vegetative stage. These were evaluated in comparison with standard commercial cold tolerant hybrids and cold susceptible checks. Genotypic variability for agro-physiological traits was observed within and across planting dates during seedling to the early developmental stages, and at maturity. All previously selected lines and hybrids for cold tolerance performed better than the cold susceptible checks. Some hybrids and lines outperformed standard commercial cold tolerant checks. The development of markers to screen for cold tolerance will facilitate selection for early planting thus expanding sorghum production to elevated areas and also making use of available early season moisture.