Skip to main content
ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Soybean Genomics & Improvement Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #347303

Research Project: Microscopy Applications for the Identification and Management of Agricultural Pests and Pathogens

Location: Soybean Genomics & Improvement Laboratory

Title: Rose rosette disease: It all started with a small mite

Author
item Bauchan, Gary
item Otero-colina, Gabriel - Colegio De Postgraduados
item Hammond, John
item Jordan, Ramon
item Ochoa, Ronald - Ron

Submitted to: Acta Horticulturae
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/7/2018
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: A small worm-like mite with only 4 legs has been shown to carry and spread rose rosette disease (RRD). Studies using various microscopy techniques have been conducted on rose samples sent to us from 12 states and Washington, DC with RRD. All rose varieties observed thus far have been found to have the RRD mite. Mites are primarily found on enclosed vegetative buds and inside the flower buds near the location where seeds are produced. Mites appear to be hiding amongst dense simple and glandular hairs at the base of the buds. The mites appear to overwinter in these same locations. We also found larger predatory mites associated with the small mites which may be useful as biological control agents. These results are important to rose producers, breeders, growers, plant protection officers, entomologists, biologists and agriculture scientists in the government, at universities, and at private universities who are interested in solving rose rosette disease problems.

Technical Abstract: A small eriophyid mite, Phyllocoptes fructiphilus, has been shown to be the vector for an emaravirus, Rose rosette virus, the causal agent of rose rosette disease (RRD). Studies are being conducted of mites on roses by various microscopy techniques including wide field, table top scanning electron microscopy and low temperature scanning electron microscopy. All cultivars which came from virus infected areas have been found to have P. fructiphilus. Mites are primarily found on enclosed petioles/scales of vegetative buds and inside the flower sepals appressed to the ovary/seeds. Mites appear to be hiding amongst dense simple and bulbous, glandular hairs (trichomes). The mites also overwinter in these same locations. In addition, predatory mites were found associated with these mites that may be useful as biological control agents of the eriophyid mites.