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ARS Home » Plains Area » Lubbock, Texas » Cropping Systems Research Laboratory » Livestock Issues Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #347251

Research Project: Nutritional Intervention and Management Strategies to Reduce Stress and Improve Health and Well-being in Cattle and Swine

Location: Livestock Issues Research

Title: Supplementation with an all-natural saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product alters intraperitoneal temperature and serum pro-inflammatory cytokines following an oral salmonella typhimiurium challenge

Author
item Sanchez, Nicole
item Carroll, Jeffery - Jeff Carroll
item Broadway, Paul
item Bass, Benjamin - Diamond V Mills, Inc
item Frank, Jason - Diamond V Mills, Inc

Submitted to: Journal of Animal Science Supplement
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/21/2017
Publication Date: 3/1/2018
Citation: Sanchez, N.C., Carroll, J.A., Broadway, P.R., Bass, B.E., Frank, J.W. 2018. Supplementation with an all-natural saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product alters intraperitoneal temperature and serum pro-inflammatory cytokines following an oral salmonella typhimiurium challenge. Journal of Animal Science Supplement. 96(Suppl-1):45-46.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: This study was designed to determine if feeding a Saccharamyces cerevisiae fermentation product to weaned pigs would reduce the acute phase response (APR) following oral challenge with Salmonella typhimurium. Pigs (n=20; 5.9 ± 0.2 kg BW) were obtained and transported to an environmentally-controlled nursery facility. Pigs were housed individually in pens with ad libitum access to feed and water. Pigs were weighed upon arrival and assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups (n = 10 pigs/treatment): 1) non-medicated starter diet (Control); 2) Control + Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product fed at 2 kg/MT (XPC; Diamond V Original XPC™, Cedar Rapids, IA). All pigs remained on their diets for 19d. Pigs were anesthetized on d6 and 15 for insertion of an intraperitoneal (i.p.) temperature recording devices and jugular catheters, respectively. On d16, pigs were challenged with 1.0 x 109 CFU Salmonella typhimurium via oral gavage. Blood samples were collected hourly from -2 to 0h and at 8-h intervals from 0 to 72h. Pigs were humanly euthanized at 72h. Pigs and feeders were weighed on d0, 6, 15, and 19. There was no effect of treatment (P=0.43) for BW, ADG, ADFI or G:F. Red blood cells (5.2 vs. 5.6±0.1 106 cells/µL) and hematocrit (26.0 vs. 28.7±0.8%) were elevated (P=0.04) in XPC compared to Control pigs prior to the challenge. Platelets were elevated (P=0.02) in XPC-supplemented compared to Control pigs throughout the challenge (675 vs. 549±34 103 cells/µL). White blood cells, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes and basophils were not affected by treatment (P=0.18). There was a tendency (P=0.09) for eosinophils to be reduced in XPC supplemented compared to Control pigs. There was a treatment x time interaction for i.p. temperature (P=0.03) where values were greater in XPC pigs at -213, -212, -197, and -183 to -181h prior to challenge, but were reduced 40, 65 and 66h post-challenge compared to Control pigs. There was a tendency (P=0.06) for a treatment x time interaction for serum IFN-' where concentrations tended to be greater in XPC supplemented pigs at 24h but reduced at 64h post-challenge compared to Control pigs . Additionally, serum IL-1ß was greater in XPC-supplemented pigs at 24h, but less at 64 and 72h post-Salmonella than Control pigs (P=0.002). These data demonstrate that feeding an all-natural Saccharamyces cerevisiae fermentation product to newly-weaned pigs had minimal effects on performance and complete blood counts, but altered serum cytokine and i.p. temperature responses following an oral Salmonella challenge.