Skip to main content
ARS Home » Plains Area » El Reno, Oklahoma » Grazinglands Research Laboratory » Agroclimate and Natural Resources Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #345747

Research Project: Uncertainty of Future Water Availability Due to Climate Change and Impacts on the Long Term Sustainability and Resilience of Agricultural Lands in the Southern Great Plains

Location: Agroclimate and Natural Resources Research

Title: Adaptation

Author
item Steiner, Jean

Submitted to: USDA Miscellaneous Publication 1343
Publication Type: Government Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/5/2017
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Climate change is ongoing and complex within an inherently dynamic system. Agricultural and forest systems dominated by human intervention are equally complex and dynamic, spanning from the natural resource base to production enterprises to the human dimensions of food security and rural community sustainability. There are large potential economic, ecological, and social effects of sensitive agricultural, forestry, and natural ecosystems exposed to climate stressors. Therefore, it is essential to develop new knowledge and technologies for adaptation at multiple scales of agricultural and forest systems and strategies to improve resilience. Because of the broad scope of USDA agencies’ missions, a diverse scientific portfolio is needed to develop and deliver adaptation strategies, practices, and technologies to meet key societal goals for the agriculture, rangeland, and forest sectors. Research needs include: 1) Basic research to improve understanding of genetic, genomic, and biogechemical processes and applications of this knowledge to developing more resilient agricultural varieties and breeds, improved understanding of the roles of soil biology in system resilience, and improve understanding of the role of the microbiome; 2) Applied science and technology and delivery in areas ranging from food safety, pest management, water management, and decision support for adaptive management; 3) Integrated, landscape-scale or systems-level science to improve understanding of the food-energy-water nexus, discern tradeoffs and optimize agroecosystems to changing climates, and develop adaptation strategies to reduce risk and increase resilience; 4) The human dimension including quantify nutrient requirements of different populations and micronutrient content of food and how these are impacted by climate and health stressors, address economics and factors affecting adoption of climate resilient technologies, improved understanding of how to increase adaptive capacity, and developing education programs to overcome barriers to adoption; and 5) Data to information to knowledge science to continue to develop, improve, and apply models of linked ecosystems and social systems, develop affordable monitoring technologies and strategies, develop methods to address big data and machine learning, and invest in infrastructures to provide big data resources to support adaptive management.

Technical Abstract: Climate change is ongoing and complex within an inherently dynamic system. Agricultural and forest systems dominated by human intervention are equally complex and dynamic, spanning from the natural resource base to production enterprises to the human dimensions of food security and rural community sustainability. There are large potential economic, ecological, and social effects of sensitive agricultural, forestry, and natural ecosystems exposed to climate stressors. Therefore, it is essential to develop new knowledge and technologies for adaptation at multiple scales of agricultural and forest systems and strategies to improve resilience. Because of the broad scope of USDA agencies’ missions, a diverse scientific portfolio is needed to develop and deliver adaptation strategies, practices, and technologies to meet key societal goals for the agriculture, rangeland, and forest sectors. Research needs include: 1) Basic research to improve understanding of genetic, genomic, and biogechemical processes and applications of this knowledge to developing more resilient agricultural varieties and breeds, improved understanding of the roles of soil biology in system resilience, and improve understanding of the role of the microbiome; 2) Applied science and technology and delivery in areas ranging from food safety, pest management, water management, and decision support for adaptive management; 3) Integrated, landscape-scale or systems-level science to improve understanding of the food-energy-water nexus, discern tradeoffs and optimize agroecosystems to changing climates, and develop adaptation strategies to reduce risk and increase resilience; 4) The human dimension including quantify nutrient requirements of different populations and micronutrient content of food and how these are impacted by climate and health stressors, address economics and factors affecting adoption of climate resilient technologies, improved understanding of how to increase adaptive capacity, and developing education programs to overcome barriers to adoption; and 5) Data to information to knowledge science to continue to develop, improve, and apply models of linked ecosystems and social systems, develop affordable monitoring technologies and strategies, develop methods to address big data and machine learning, and invest in infrastructures to provide big data resources to support adaptive management.