Skip to main content
ARS Home » Plains Area » Lubbock, Texas » Cropping Systems Research Laboratory » Plant Stress and Germplasm Development Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #342195

Research Project: Enhancing Plant Resistance to Water-Deficit and Thermal Stresses in Economically Important Crops

Location: Plant Stress and Germplasm Development Research

Title: Comparison of hydrocarbon yields in cotton from field grown vs. greenhouse grown plants

Author
item Adams, Robert - Baylor University
item Tebeest, Amy - Baylor University
item Ulloa, Mauricio
item Witt, Travis
item Burke, John
item Frelichowski, James - Jim
item Hinze, Lori

Submitted to: Phytologia
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/20/2017
Publication Date: 8/8/2017
Citation: Adams, R.P., TeBeest, A.K., Ulloa, M., Witt, T.W., Burke, J.J., Frelichowski, J.E., Hinze, L.L. 2017. Comparison of hydrocarbon yields in cotton from field grown vs. greenhouse grown plants. Phytologia. 99(3):200-207.

Interpretive Summary: The interest in sustainable and renewable sources of petrochemicals continues from arid and semi-arid land crops because of the uncertainty of sustained crude oil production in the world. Recently, we reported that cotton presents a new possibility as a hydrocarbon source because of its growth habit as a perennial crop and adaptation to long and hot growing seasons. To further investigate hydrocarbon (HC) production in cotton, four cultivars (SA-1181, 1403, 1419, and 2269) from the USDA National Cotton Germplasm Collection were grown both in field conditions and a greenhouse to compare the environmental effects on leaf biomass, percent-yield of HC, and total HC (g HC /g leaves) under natural and controlled (protected) conditions. In addition, the HC production was also investigated through different developmental stages under these different conditions. Overall, the environmental component to the yield of free HC in cotton leaves was a major factor. All four cultivars produced high percent-HC yields under field conditions. This trend corresponds to literature reports of large induction of defense chemicals in cotton upon attack by herbivores and diseases. The same pattern has been found in sunflowers and is discussed in regards to cotton in this report. Through the different developmental stages, the variation in HC for cultivar SA-2269 showed that HC yields in leaves remained at a constant, low level from bud to flowering, then increased rapidly as bolls matured. In addition to its valuable fiber and seed for oil, cotton can also be now another possible renewable source for hydrocarbons, and promising accessions in the USDA Germplasm Collection are readily available to all breeders and scientists.

Technical Abstract: Four accession of cotton (SA-1181, 1403, 1419, and 2269) were grown both in field conditions and a greenhouse to compare the environmental effects on leaf biomass, % yield of hydrocarbons (HC), and total HC (g HC /g leaves) under natural and controlled (protected) conditions. Leaf biomass was similar but higher in two field cultivated accessions. All four accessions produced higher % HC yields under field conditions, with greenhouse plants producing lower yields ranging from 20.6 to 46.0% as much HC as found in naturally grown plants. Total HC yields (g HC / g 10 leaves) were even lower in the greenhouse with yields being only 19.7 to 39.1% as high as from field grown plants. Overall, the environmental component to the yield of free HC in cotton leaves was a major factor, with the genetic component contributing to less than half (46%) of the HC yield. This trend corresponds to literature reports of large induction of defense chemicals in cotton upon attack by herbivores and diseases. The same pattern has been found in sunflowers and is discussed in regards to cotton. Ontogenetic variation in HC for SA-2269 showed HC yields in leaves remained at a constant, low level from bud to flowering, then increased rapidly as bolls matured.