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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Molecular Plant Pathology Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #337726

Research Project: NOVEL DISEASE CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR CELLULAR AND SUB-CELLULAR PATHOGENS

Location: Molecular Plant Pathology Laboratory

Title: Crinivirus and begomovirus detection in tomato plantlets and weeds associated to nurseries in Cartago province

Author
item Solorzano-morales, Antony - Universidad De Costa Rica
item Castro Vasquez, Ruth - Universidad De Costa Rica
item Barboza Vargas, Natalia - Universidad De Costa Rica
item Hernandez Jimenez, Eduardo - Universidad De Costa Rica
item Hammond, Rosemarie
item Ramirez Fonseca, Pilar - Universidad De Costa Rica

Submitted to: Agronomia Mesoamericana (Mesoamerican Journal of Agronomy-Agriculture and Livestock) (ISSN:2215-3608)
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/21/2017
Publication Date: 4/21/2017
Citation: Solorzano-Morales, A., Castro Vasquez, R., Barboza Vargas, N., Hernandez Jimenez, E., Hammond, R., Ramirez Fonseca, P. 2017. Crinivirus and begomovirus detection in tomato plantlets and weeds associated to nurseries in Cartago province. Agronomia Mesoamericana (Mesoamerican Journal of Agronomy-Agriculture and Livestock) (ISSN:2215-3608). 28(2):1-12.

Interpretive Summary: Whiteflies and whitefly-borne viruses are major constraints to the production of tomato both in field and greenhouse settings. Limited data exists on the presence and predominance of whitefly-borne viruses in the major tomato production greenhouses in the Cartago province of Costa Rica. In this study, we identified tomato chlorosis virus (ToCV) and geminiviruses in tomatoes and in weed species in tomato nursery greenhouses in this region. These results suggest that virus-infected tomato plantlets, when commercialized, could serve as pathway of virus introduction to other regions of the country. Finally, weeds growing around greenhouses have been shown to be potential viral sources of ToCV and begomoviruses. The results of our study have been communicated to growers in Costa Rica and are being used to assess the incidence of the virus and their economic impact on tomato production. The results impact U.S. agriculture as whitefly-borne viruses are emerging as a serious threat to tomato production in North America.

Technical Abstract: The aim of this work was to detect plant infections caused by Tomato chlorosis virus (ToCV) and begomoviruses in tomato plantlets, as well as in weeds growing around nursery greenhouses. During one year, starting in April 2008, 168 leaf tissue samples were collected, 90 tomato plantlets and 78 weeds from three different nurseries in the Cartago province, Costa Rica. Reverse transcription and real time polymerase chain reactions (qRT-PCR) were used to determine that 18.9% of tomato plantlets and 7.7% of weeds were infected with ToCV. Begomoviruses were detected using dot blot hybridization and non-radioactive probes. Begomovirus hybridization results were confirmed using Rolling Circle Amplification (RCA) followed by PCR, using universal primers. None of the tomato plantlets were positive for begomoviruses when tested, but there were six weeds infected; in fact, Phytolacca icosandra and Brassica sp. were co-infected with ToCV and begomoviruses. These results suggest that ToCV-infected tomato plantlets, when commercialized, could serve as way of virus introduction to other regions of the country. Finally, weeds growing around greenhouses have been shown to be potential viral sources of ToCV and begomoviruses.