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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » National Clonal Germplasm Repository » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #336582

Research Project: Management of Temperate-Adapted Fruit, Nut, and Specialty Crop Genetic Resources and Associated Information

Location: National Clonal Germplasm Repository

Title: Blackberries: an introduction

Author
item Hummer, Kim

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/31/2016
Publication Date: 11/6/2017
Citation: Hummer, K.E. 2017. Blackberries: an introduction. In: Hall, H.K., Funk, R.C., editors. Blackberries and their Hybrids. Oxford, England, United Kingdom: CABI. p. 1-16.

Interpretive Summary: Blackberries are members of the rose family and the plant genus Rubus. Raspberries, their close relatives, are grouped in a different section of that same genus. From a horticultural standpoint, each blackberry fruit is an aggregate of small fruits. Each of these small fruits, or drupelet, is derived from one ovary that produces one hard coated seed. The drupelets are attached to acenter receptacle. When the fruit is ripe, the drupelets remain attached to the receptacle, breaking away from the stem as a single unit ready for consumption. Blackberry plants grow in the temperate zone and have many forms. Most blackberries have “thorns”, or what botanists term “prickles.” Besides having thorns or prickles on their stems and petioles, blackberries may also have bristles. This is an introductory chapter to a 17 chapter book on the developments in the blackberry industry. This book provides a comprehensive yet concise reference for horticulture students, blackberry growers, producers, and fruit industry personnel looking for the latest production information.

Technical Abstract: lackberries are members of Rubus subgenus Rubus, while raspberries, their close relatives, are grouped in Rubus subgenus Idaeobatus. From a horticultural standpoint, each blackberry fruit is an aggregation of drupelets. Each drupelet is derived from one ovary that produces one hard coated seed (pyrene). The seed is incased in a fleshy mesocarp with a surrounding exocarp (fruit skin). The drupelets are attached to a receptacle (torus). When the fruit is ripe, the drupelets remain attached to the receptacle, breaking away (dehiscing) from the stem (petiole) as a single unit ready for consumption.Blackberry plants grow in the temperate zone and have many forms. Most blackberries are “armed.” That means that they have “thorns”, or what botanists term “prickles.” Besides having thorns or prickles on their stems and petioles, blackberries may also have bristles. Frequently, thorny blackberries also have thorns on the mid-rib on the underside of the leaves. Reports on developments in the blackberry industry have been described by international experts in 17 chapters. This book provides a comprehensive yet concise reference for horticulture students, blackberry growers, producers, and fruit industry personnel looking for the latest production information. This is the introductory chapter for this blackberry book.