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ARS Home » Plains Area » College Station, Texas » Southern Plains Agricultural Research Center » Crop Germplasm Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #334817

Research Project: CHARACTERIZATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF RESISTANCE IN SORGHUM TO FUNGAL PATHOGENS

Location: Crop Germplasm Research

Title: Assessing the vulnerability of sorghum converted lines to anthracnose and downy mildew infection

Author
item Prom, Louis
item Perumal, Ramasamy - Kansas State University
item Cuevas, Hugo
item Radwan, Ghada - Mount Saint Vincent University, Nova Scotia
item Katile, Seriba - Mali Institute D'Economie
item Isakeit, Thomas - Texas A&M University
item Magill, Clint - Texas A&M University

Submitted to: Journal of Agriculture and Crops
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/20/2016
Publication Date: 11/1/2016
Citation: Prom, L.K., Perumal, R., Cuevas, H.E., Radwan, G., Katile, S., Isakeit, T., Magill, C. 2016. Assessing the vulnerability of sorghum converted lines to anthracnose and downy mildew infection. Journal of Agriculture and Crops. 2(10):101-106.

Interpretive Summary: Sorghum anthracnose and downy mildew are serious fungal diseases which can reduce the crop yield and quality, especially if susceptible sorghum lines are planted in areas where these diseases occur. The study identified nine lines that showed resistance to anthracnose and 15 lines that recorded moderate resistance to sorghum downy mildew (SDM). A positive significant association between anthracnose and SDM was observed, indicating that the lines showing higher SDM incidence favors higher anthracnose infection. This work is significant because it has identified potential new sources of anthracnose and downy mildew resistance in sorghum that can be utilized by breeders in the USA and abroad to develop new lines and hybrids.

Technical Abstract: A total of 59 converted sorghum lines and six checks were evaluated for resistance to two foliar fungal diseases, anthracnose and downy mildew (SDM) in 2008 and 2009 growing seasons at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research Farm, College Station, Texas. In 2008, 23 lines exhibited resistance (35%), 29 susceptible (45%) and 13 variable responses (20%) while 15 lines showed resistance (28%), 31 susceptible (57%), and eight variable responses to anthracnose in 2009. Nine lines SC748, PI534101, PI534073, PI533950, PI534155, PI533802, PI533776, PI533911 and PI533759 exhibited anthracnose resistance response in both years. Significantly a wide range of 8 to 89% SDM incidence was observed in the study. None of the lines recorded SDM resistance reaction in both years. However, 15 lines PI534119, PI533983, PI597970, PI534160, PI570726, PI534161, PI534112, PI576374, PI533753, SC748, PI533991, PI569998, PI534050, PI534155 and PI533898 recorded moderate resistance to SDM incidence and recommended for use in further breeding programs. There was a positive significant correlation (P = 0.0392) between anthracnose and SDM, indicating that the lines showing higher SDM incidence favors higher anthracnose infection. Significant correlation between precipitation and SDM was also noted. SC748 and PI534155 exhibited resistance to anthracnose and downy mildew diseases and hold promise for utilization in breeding programs as potential checks.