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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Reno, Nevada » Great Basin Rangelands Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #334312

Research Project: Integrating Ecological Process Knowledge into Effective Management of Invasive Plants in Great Basin Rangelands

Location: Great Basin Rangelands Research

Title: Spatial and host-associated variation in prevalence and population density of wheat curl mite (Aceria tosichella) cryptic genotypes in agricultural landscapes

Author
item SKORACKA, ANNA - Adam Mickiewicz University
item LEWANDOWSKI, MARIUSZ - Warsaw University Of Life Sciences
item Rector, Brian
item SZYDLO, WIKTORIA - Adam Mickiewicz University
item KUCZYNSKI, LECHOSLAW - Adam Mickiewicz University

Submitted to: PLoS One
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/3/2017
Publication Date: 1/18/2017
Citation: Skoracka, A., Lewandowski, M., Rector, B.G., Szydlo, W., Kuczynski, L. 2017. Spatial and host-associated variation in prevalence and population density of wheat curl mite (Aceria tosichella) cryptic genotypes in agricultural landscapes. PLoS One. doi: 10.1371.journal.pone.0169874

Interpretive Summary: Basic ecological knowledge surrounding the distribution and abundance of pest organisms is essential for effective and sustainable management. In this study, the geographic ranges of 16 lineages of the wheat curl mite (Aceria tosichella; WCM), a global pest of wheat and other cereals, were studied across the entire area of Poland (>31 million ha), part of its native range, with respect to the distributions of their different host-plant species. Three main results were observed: 1) the majority of WCM lineages showed variable patterns of presence and/or abundance both geographically and with respect to their hosts; 2) the 16 WCM lineages grouped into four discrete host assemblages based on host preference and pattern of infestation; and 3) occurrence and local abundance of the most pestiferous WCM lineages was determined. These results, combined with thermal-niche, topographic, and agricultural usage data should enable accurate prediction of pestiferous WCM lineage outbreaks, not only for Poland but for cereal-producing regions worldwide with similar features.

Technical Abstract: The wheat curl mite (WCM), Aceria tosichella Keifer, is a major pest of cereals worldwide that also comprises a complex of at least 16 genetic lineages with divergent physiological traits, including host preference and specificity. The goal of this study was to test the extent to which host-plant species and landscape spatial variation influence WCM presence and population density across the entire area of Poland (>31 million ha). Three important findings arose from the results of the study: 1) the majority of WCM lineages analyzed exhibited variation in patterns of prevalence and/or population density on both spatial and host-associated scales; 2) the 16 WCM lineages under study assorted within four discrete host assemblages based on host preference and pattern of infestation; and 3) areas of occurrence and local abundance were determined for specific WCM lineages, including the most pestiferous ones. These results, combined with thermal-niche, topographic, and agricultural usage data should enable accurate prediction of pestiferous WCM lineage outbreaks, not only for Poland but for cereal-producing regions worldwide with similar features, with implications for changing climates. They also provide insight into the evolution of pest species of domesticated crops.