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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Animal Parasitic Diseases Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #333480

Research Project: Detection and Control of Foodborne Parasites for Food Safety

Location: Animal Parasitic Diseases Laboratory

Title: Serological survey of diseases of free-ranging gray wolves (Canis lupus) in Minnesota

Author
item Carstensen, Michelle - Minnesota Department Of Natural Resources
item Guidice, John - Minnesota Department Of Natural Resources
item Hildebrand, Eric - Minnesota Department Of Natural Resources
item Dubey, Jitender
item Erb, John - Minnesota Department Of Natural Resources
item Stark, Dan - Minnesota Department Of Natural Resources
item Hart, John - US Department Of Agriculture (USDA)
item Barber-meyer, Shannon - Us Geological Survey (USGS)
item Mech, David - Us Geological Survey (USGS)
item Wendels, Steve - Voyageurs National Park
item Edwards, Andrew - 1854 Treaty Authority

Submitted to: Journal of Wildlife Diseases
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/1/2016
Publication Date: 7/1/2017
Citation: Carstensen, M., Guidice, J.H., Hildebrand, E.C., Dubey, J.P., Erb, J., Stark, D., Hart, J., Barber-Meyer, S., Mech, D.L., Wendels, S.K., Edwards, A.J. 2017. Serological survey of diseases of free-ranging gray wolves (Canis lupus) in Minnesota. Journal of Wildlife Diseases. 53:459-471.

Interpretive Summary: no summary given

Technical Abstract: We tested serologic samples from 387 free-ranging wolves (Canis lupus) from 2007–2013 for exposure to 8 canid pathogens to establish baseline data on disease prevalence and spatial distribution in Minnesota’s wolf population. We found high exposure to canine adenovirus 1 and 2 (88% adults, 45% pups), canine parvovirus (82% adults, 24% pups), and Lyme disease (76% adults, 39% pups). An average of 66% of adults and 36% of pups exhibited exposure to the protozoan parasite, Neospora caninum. Exposure to arboviruses was confirmed, including West Nile Virus (37% adults, 18% pups) and the first detection of eastern equine encephalitis (3% adults) reported in wolves. Exposure rates were lower for canine distemper (19% adults, 5% pups) and heartworm (7% adults, 3% pups). Significant spatial trends were observed in wolves exposed to canine parvovirus and Lyme disease. Serologic data do not confirm clinical disease, but better understanding of disease ecology of wolves can provide valuable insight into wildlife population dynamics and improve management of these species. Key Words: antibody titer, canine distemper, canine parvovirus, Canis lupus, eastern equine encephalitis, Lyme disease, Neospora caninum