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ARS Home » Plains Area » Fort Collins, Colorado » Center for Agricultural Resources Research » Plant and Animal Genetic Resources Preservation » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #331902

Research Project: Plant and Microbial Genetic Resource Preservation and Quality Assessment

Location: Plant and Animal Genetic Resources Preservation

Title: Procedures and best management practices for genetically engineered traits in USDA/ARS germplasm and breeding lines

Author
item Greene, Stephanie
item Blalock, June - Retired ARS Employee
item Gardner, Candice
item Hellier, Barbara
item Mcgrath, J Mitchell - Mitch
item Nelson, Randall
item Percy, Richard
item Scorza, Ralph
item Scott, Roy
item Yeater, Kathleen
item Bretting, Peter

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/28/2015
Publication Date: 11/15/2015
Citation: Greene, S.L., Blalock, J., Gardner, C.A., Hellier, B.C., Mcgrath, J.M., Nelson, R.L., Percy, R.G., Scorza, R., Scott, R.A., Yeater, K.M., Bretting, P.K. 2015. Procedures and best management practices for genetically engineered traits in USDA/ARS germplasm and breeding lines. Meeting Abstract. Crop Science Society of America, Minneapolis, MN. Nov. 15-18, 2015.

Interpretive Summary: Today more than 80% of corn, soybean, canola, sugar beet and cotton acreage in the United States is planted to genetically engineered varieties. But how do we ensure the seed purity of conventional varieties? In 2012 the USDA Advisory Committee on Biotechnology and 21st Century Agriculture recommended that USDA develop best management practices and the USDA Agricultural Research Service convened a team of experts to carry out the recommendation. Five elements are central to the best management practices: (i) crop-specific management practices to maintain seed purity of germplasm accessions and breeding stocks; (ii) purity testing at critical control points; (iii) mandatory purity testing of new varieties or enhanced germplasm prior to formal release; (iv) guidelines for mitigating the effects of adventitious presence of transgenes; (v) communication strategies for disseminating information about USDA/ARS procedures for handling future occurrences of adventitious presence. These practices build on the current procedures for maintaining the genetic integrity of USDA/ARS germplasm collections and breeding stocks.

Technical Abstract: Two decades have passed since the commercialization in the U. S. of crops with genetically engineered (GE) traits. Today more than 80% of corn, soybean, canola, sugar beet and cotton acreage in the United States is planted to transgenic cultivars, but concerns exist regarding how best to manage the unintended occurrence of GE traits in conventional germplasm and breeding lines. In 2012 the USDA Advisory Committee on Biotechnology and 21st Century Agriculture (AC 21) recommended that USDA develop best management practices (BMPs) for monitoring and maintaining the genetic integrity of publicly held plant germplasm and breeding stocks with respect to genetically engineered traits. In 2014, the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) convened a team to develop such BMPs. Five elements are central to the BMPs: (i) crop-specific BMPs to maintain seed purity of germplasm accessions and breeding stocks; (ii) purity testing at critical control points; (iii) mandatory purity testing of new varieties or enhanced germplasm prior to formal release; (iv) guidelines for mitigating the effects of adventitious presence (AP) of transgenes; (v) communication strategies for disseminating information about USDA/ARS procedures for handling future occurrences of AP of transgenes. These BMPs build on the current procedures for maintaining the genetic integrity of USDA/ARS germplasm collections and breeding stocks.