Skip to main content
ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Invasive Insect Biocontrol & Behavior Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #328454

Research Project: Insect Management Systems for Urban Small Farms and Gardens

Location: Invasive Insect Biocontrol & Behavior Laboratory

Title: Biological control of sentinel egg masses of the exotic invasive stink bug halyomorpha halys (Stål) in Mid-Atlantic USA ornamental landscapes

Author
item Cornelius, Mary
item Dieckhoff, Christine
item Hoelmer, Kim
item Olsen, Richard
item Weber, Donald
item Herlihy, Megan
item Talamas, Elijah
item Vinyard, Bryan
item Greenstone, Matthew

Submitted to: Biological Control
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/26/2016
Publication Date: 7/28/2016
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/62987
Citation: Cornelius, M.L., Dieckhoff, C., Hoelmer, K.A., Olsen, R.T., Weber, D.C., Herlihy, M.V., Talamas, E.J., Vinyard, B.T., Greenstone, M.H. 2016. Biological control of sentinel egg masses of the exotic invasive stink bug halyomorpha halys (Stål) in Mid-Atlantic USA ornamental landscapes. Biological Control. 103:11-20.

Interpretive Summary: Biological invasions have far reaching effects on native plant and arthropod communities. This study evaluated the effect of natural enemies on eggs of the exotic invasive stink bug Halyomorpha halys (Stål) in experimental plots comprising species pairs of exotic and native ornamental trees and shrubs and in wooded areas adjacent to the plots. Overall, rates of parasitism and predation in experimental plots were low, accounting for only 3.6 % and 4.5% of egg mortality, respectively. There were no significant differences in parasitism and predation rates in native or exotic plots or on plants of different genera. In 2015, predation was significantly higher in the experimental plots than in the wooded sites, but parasitism was significantly higher in the wooded sites. In the experimental plots, seven native and one exotic parasitoid species attacked sentinel egg masses. It is important to evaluate the efficacy of biological control agents for controlling populations of invasive species. If biological control agents are ineffective in suppressing nymphal emergence in forested areas and urban ornamental landscapes, populations in these habitats may hasten the spread of this invasive species into fruit and field crops.

Technical Abstract: Biological invasions have far reaching effects on native plant and arthropod communities. This study evaluated the effect of natural enemies on eggs of the exotic invasive stink bug Halyomorpha halys (Stål) in experimental plots comprising species pairs of 16 ornamental trees and shrub genera from either Eurasia or North America and in wooded areas adjacent to the plots. Sentinel egg masses were placed on leaves of Acer, Cercis, Hydrangea, and Prunus in the plots and in seven genera of trees and shrubs in adjacent woods. Overall, rates of parasitism and predation in experimental plots were low, accounting for only 3.6 % and 4.5% of egg mortality, respectively. There were no significant differences in parasitism and predation rates in native or exotic plots or on plants of different genera. In 2015, predation was significantly higher in the experimental plots than in the wooded sites, but parasitism was significantly higher in the wooded sites. In the experimental plots, seven native and one exotic parasitoid species attacked sentinel egg masses. Parasitoids in the genus Trissolcus were more likely to parasitize eggs in exotic plots than in native plots. If biological control agents are ineffective in suppressing nymphal emergence in forested areas and urban ornamental landscapes, populations in these habitats may hasten the spread of this invasive species into fruit and field crops.