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ARS Home » Plains Area » Lubbock, Texas » Cropping Systems Research Laboratory » Livestock Issues Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #328169

Research Project: Improving Immunity, Health, and Well-Being in Cattle and Swine

Location: Livestock Issues Research

Title: Supplementation of Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product can attenuate the acute phase response following a lipopolysaccharide challenge in pigs.

Author
item Broadway, Paul
item Carroll, Jeffery - Jeff Carroll
item Sanchez, Nicole
item Bass, Ben - Diamond V Mills, Inc
item Frank, Jason - Diamond V Mills, Inc

Submitted to: Journal of Animal Science Supplement
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/20/2015
Publication Date: 3/1/2016
Citation: Broadway, P.R., Carroll, J.A., Sanchez, N.C., Bass, B.E., Frank, J.W. 2016. Supplementation of Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product can attenuate the acute phase response following a lipopolysaccharide challenge in pigs.. Journal of Animal Science Supplement. 94(Supplement 2)"144, Abstract#307.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: This study was designed to determine if feeding a Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product to weaned pigs would reduce stress and acute phase responses (APR) following a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pigs (n=30; 6.4±0.1 kilograms body weight) were housed individually in pens with ad libitum access to feed and water. Pigs were weighed upon arrival, assigned to 1 of 3 groups (n=10/treatment), and fed for 18 days: 1) Control, fed a non-medicated starter diet; 2) Control + Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product at 1 kilogram per metric ton (SGX1; Diamond V SynGenX™, Cedar Rapids, IA), and 3) Control + Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product at 2 kilograms per metric ton (SGX2). Pigs were anesthetized on days 7 and 14 for insertion of an intra-peritoneal temperature device and jugular catheter, respectively. On day 15, pigs were challenged i.v. with LPS (25 micrograms per kilogram of body weight). Blood samples were collected at 0.5 hour (serum) and 1 hour (complete blood cell counts) intervals from -2 to 8 hours and at 24 hours relative to LPS administration at 0 hour. Pigs were weighed on days 7, 14, and 18, while feeders were weighed on days 7, 11, 14, 17, and 18. There was a treatment by time interaction (P<0.01) for pig body weight and average daily gain. The SGX1 pigs had the greatest body weight at 7, 14, and 18 days. Pig average daily gain was greater in SGX1 and SGX2 on day14, yet was less on day 18 compared to Control. In response to LPS, there was a greater change in intra-peritoneal temperature in Control pigs compared to SGX1 and SGX2 pigs (P<0.01). There was a treatment by time interaction (P=0.006) for cortisol; SGX2 pigs had decreased cortisol from 2.5 to 4.5 hours and at 5.5 and 6.5 hours compared to SGX1 and/or Control pigs. White blood cells, neutrophils and lymphocytes were decreased in SGX1 and SGX2 compared to Control pigs (P<0.001). There were treatment by time interactions for TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma and IL-6 (P=0.04). Specifically, SGX1 pigs had a decreased (P=0.04) TNF-alpha response while SGX2 pigs had a greater (P= 0.01) response. The IFN-gamma response was delayed and decreased in SGX2 pigs compared to Control and SGX1 pigs (P=0.02). The IL-6 response was decreased in both SGX1 and SGX2 compared to Control pigs (P=0.01). These data demonstrate that feeding a Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product to weaned pigs can attenuate the APR to an LPS challenge.