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ARS Home » Plains Area » Lubbock, Texas » Cropping Systems Research Laboratory » Livestock Issues Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #327749

Research Project: Improving Immunity, Health, and Well-Being in Cattle and Swine

Location: Livestock Issues Research

Title: Supplementation with a Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product alters the metabolic response following a lipopolysaccharide challenge in weaned pigs

Author
item Sanchez, Nicole
item Carroll, Jeffery - Jeff Carroll
item Broadway, Paul
item Bass, Benjamin - Diamond V Mills, Inc
item Frank, Jason - Diamond V Mills, Inc

Submitted to: Journal of Animal Science Supplement
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/21/2016
Publication Date: 7/1/2016
Citation: Sanchez, N.C., Carroll, J.A., Broadway, P.R., Bass, B.E., Frank, J.W. 2016. Supplementation with a Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product alters the metabolic response following a lipopolysaccharide challenge in weaned pigs. Journal of Animal Science Supplement. 94(E-Supplement 5):503, Abstract#1069.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: This study was designed to determine if feeding a Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product to weaned pigs would alter the metabolic response following a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pigs (n=30; 6.4+/-0.1 kg BW) were housed individually with ad libitum access to feed and water. Pigs were weighed upon arrival, assigned to 1 of 3 groups (n=10/treatment), and fed for 18 d: 1) Control, fed a non-medicated starter diet; 2) Control + Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product at 1 kg/MT (SGX1; Diamond V SynGenX™, Cedar Rapids, IA), and 3) Control + Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product at 2 kg/MT (SGX2). Pigs were anesthetized on d 7 and 14 for insertion of an i.p. temperature device and jugular catheter, respectively. On d 15, pigs were challenged i.v. with LPS (25 microgram/kg BW LPS from E. coli O111:B4). Blood samples were collected at 0.5 h intervals from -2 to 8 h and at 24 h relative to LPS administration at 0 h and serum isolated for glucose, NEFA, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) analysis. There was a treatment x time interaction (P<0.001) for serum glucose; Control pigs had greater glucose than SGX1 and/or SGX2 pigs at 0.5, 1.5, 2.5, 4, 5, and 6.5h post-LPS (P=0.04), while SGX2 had greater glucose than SGX1 at 3.5 h (P=0.02). Baseline (-2 to 0h) NEFA was affected by treatment (P<0.001) such that SGX1 pigs had the greatest (0.12+/-0.01mmol/L) followed by Control (0.10+/-0.01 mmol/L) and SGX2 pigs (0.08+/-0.01 mmol/L). Thus, NEFA were analyzed as the change relative to baseline values. There were treatment (P=0.006) and time (P<0.001) effects for the change in NEFA; Control (0.23+/-0.02 mmol/L) and SGX2 (0.27+/-0.02 mmol/L) pigs had a greater change in NEFA than SGX1 pigs (0.15+/-0.02 mmol/L). Baseline serum BUN was affected by treatment (P<0.001); Control (12.62+/-0.41 mg/dL) and SGX2 (13.26+/-0.35 mg/dL) pigs had greater BUN than SGX1 pigs (10.86+/-0.40 mg/dL); thus serum BUN were analyzed as the change relative to baseline values. There was a treatment x time interaction (P=0.004) for the change in BUN; SGX1 pigs had greater BUN than Control and/or SGX2 at 0.5, 4, 5 to 6, 7, 7.5, and 24 h post-LPS challenge. These data demonstrate that feeding a Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product to weaned pigs may alter the redistribution of energy stores in response to an immune challenge which may expedite recovery.