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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Systematic Entomology Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #325644

Research Project: Systematics of Lepidoptera: Invasive Species, Pest and Biological Control Agents

Location: Systematic Entomology Laboratory

Title: The first record of Baccharis L. (Asteraceae) as a host-plant genus for Nepticulidae (Lepidoptera), with description of new Stigmella species from South America

Author
item Stonis, Jonas - Institute Of Botany - Vilnius
item Diskus, Arunas - Institute Of Botany - Vilnius
item Remeikis, Andrius - Institute Of Botany - Vilnius
item Davis, Donald - Smithsonian Institute
item Solis, M
item Cumbicus, Torres, Nixon - Central University Of Ecuador

Submitted to: Zootaxa
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/19/2016
Publication Date: 7/5/2016
Citation: Stonis, J.R., Diskus, A., Remeikis, A., Davis, D.R., Solis, M.A., Cumbicus, T. 2016. The first record of Baccharis L. (Asteraceae) as a host-plant genus for Nepticulidae (Lepidoptera), with description of new Stigmella species from South America. Zootaxa. 4136:101-128. doi: 10.11646/zootaxa.4136.1.4.

Interpretive Summary: Baccharis or “broom” plant species have become invasive weeds where they are not native and some are becoming extinct due to habitat destruction. Some species are toxic to animals such as cattle, horses, sheep and rabbits, and other species are welcomed by beekeepers for their nectar. This is the first record of a nepticulid moth larva feeding on Baccharis. This research describes four species new to science of leaf-mining moths feeding on this plant group in South America. The adults, their genitalia, and their leaf mines are illustrated. This research will be useful to biological control and conservation biologists studying arthropod feeders of broom plants.

Technical Abstract: We record the first Nepticulidae species found to feed on Baccharis L. (Asteraceae). Despite the high species richness of Baccharis in the Western Hemisphere, no nepticulid has ever been recorded feeding on Baccharis. In this paper we describe four new Stigmella Schrank species feeding on Baccharis: S. emarginatae Diskus & Stonis, sp. nov., S. bipartita Diskus & Stonis, sp. nov., S. latifoliae Remeikis, Diskus & Stonis, sp. nov., and S. baccharicola Diskus & Stonis, sp. nov. The remaining four taxa are left unnamed. All taxa are illustrated with photographs of adults, their genitalia, and their leaf-mines. Additionally, leaf-mines on Baccharis salicifolia are documented.