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ARS Home » Plains Area » Lubbock, Texas » Cropping Systems Research Laboratory » Livestock Issues Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #325187

Research Project: Improving Immunity, Health, and Well-Being in Cattle and Swine

Location: Livestock Issues Research

Title: Modulation of the acute phase response following a lipopolysaccharide challenge in pigs supplemented with an all-natural Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product

Author
item Carroll, Jeffery - Jeff Carroll
item Sanchez, Nicole
item Broadway, Paul
item Bass, Benjamin - Diamond V Mills, Inc
item Frank, Jason - Diamond V Mills, Inc

Submitted to: Journal of Animal Science Supplement
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/11/2015
Publication Date: 2/7/2016
Citation: Carroll, J.A., Sanchez, N.C., Broadway, P.R., Bass, B.E., Frank, J.W. 2016. Modulation of the acute phase response following a lipopolysaccharide challenge in pigs supplemented with an all-natural Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product. Journal of Animal Science Supplement. 94(Supplement 1):3B.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: This study was designed to determine if feeding a Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product to weaned pigs would reduce the stress and acute phase responses (APR) following an acute lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pigs (n = 20; 6.4 +/- 0.2 kg body weight) were obtained and transported to an environmentally-controlled nursery facility. Pigs were housed individually in pens with ad libitum access to feed and water. Pigs were weighed upon arrival and assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups (n = 10 pigs/treatment): 1) non-medicated starter diet (Control); 2) Control + Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product fed at 2 kg/metric ton (XPC; Diamond V Original XPC™, Cedar Rapids, IA). All pigs remained on their diets for 18 days. Pigs were anesthetized on days 7 and 14 for insertion of an intraperitoneal (IP) temperature recording devices and jugular catheters, respectively. On day 15, pigs were challenged intraveneously with LPS (25 microgram/kg body weight). Blood samples were collected at 0.5 hour (serum) and 1 hour (complete blood cell counts) intervals from -2 to 8 hours and at 24 hours relative to LPS administration at 0 hour. Pigs were weighed on days 7, 14, and 18, while feeders were weighed on days 7, 11, 14, 17, and 18. There was no effect of treatment (P = 0.69) for body weight, average daily gain, or feed disappearance, although an increase over time was observed (P < 0.01). Control pigs had greater (P = 0.03) white blood cell (15.4 vs. 11.9 +/- 0.5 10^3 cells/microliter), neutrophil (7.1 vs. 4.6 +/- 0.3 10^3 cells/microliter), and lymphocyte (7.4 vs. 6.6 +/- 0.2 10^3 cells/microliter) counts compared to XPC-supplemented pigs. Serum cortisol increased (P < 0.01) after LPS administration but was not affected by treatment (P = 0.92). There was a treatment effect (P = 0.002) for serum TNF-alpha and IL-6 such that concentrations were greater in XPC-supplemented pigs than Control pigs (116.5 +/- 5.0 vs 90.9 +/- 5.2 pgs/mL TNF-alpha; 188.3 +/- 13.4 vs. 133.4 +/- 11.7 pg/mL IL-6) following LPS challenge. Administration of LPS increased IP temperature (P < 0.01) in all pigs, however, there was no effect of treatment (P = 0.12). These data demonstrate that feeding an all-natural Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product to newly-weaned pigs can modulate the APR to an LPS challenge without affecting performance.