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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Parlier, California » San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Sciences Center » Crop Diseases, Pests and Genetics Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #323448

Research Project: Epidemiology and Management of Pierce's Disease and Other Maladies of Grape

Location: Crop Diseases, Pests and Genetics Research

Title: Whole genome sequence analyses of Xylella fastidiosa PD strains from different geographical regions

Author
item Chen, Jianchi
item Wallis, Christopher

Submitted to: CDFA Pierce's Disease Control Program Research Symposium
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/15/2015
Publication Date: 12/15/2015
Citation: Chen, J., Wallis, C.M. 2015. Whole genome sequence analyses of Xylella fastidiosa PD strains from different geographical regions. In: Esser T, Randhawa R, eds. Research Progress Reports: Pierce's disease and other designated pests and diseases of winegrapes, December, 2015. California Department of Food and Agriculture, Sacramento CA. p. 249.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Genome sequences were determined for two Pierce’s disease (PD) causing Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) strains, one from Florida and one from Taiwan. The Florida strain was ATCC 35879, the type of strain used as a standard reference for related taxonomy research. By contrast, the Taiwan strain used was only recently characterized, and therefore it is of importance for PD epidemiological studies. Genome sequencing of the Taiwan PD strain was the result of collaboration between ARS and National Chung Hsing University. Whole genome sequence comparison between the Taiwan strain and the strain from Florida, as well as with existing sequences from California and Texas, showed that the Taiwan PD strain was highly similar to American PD strains. This led in part to the classification of the Taiwan strain to Xf subsp. fastidiosa. However, variations were found for this strain at various hypervariable loci such as those with small tandem repeats. While the biological nature of these variations remains unclear, these hypervariable loci could be used to assist in strain differentiation.