Skip to main content
ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » Forage Seed and Cereal Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #322130

Research Project: Reducing the Impact of Diseases on Hop Production

Location: Forage Seed and Cereal Research

Title: Epidemiology and population biology of pseudoperonospora cubensis: a model system for management of downy mildews

Author
item Ojiambo, Peter - North Carolina State University
item Gent, David - Dave
item Quesada-ocampo, Lina - North Carolina State University
item Hausbeck, Mary - Michigan State University
item Holmes, Gerald - California Polytechnic State University

Submitted to: Annual Review of Phytopathology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/31/2015
Publication Date: 8/31/2015
Citation: Ojiambo, P.S., Gent, D.H., Quesada-Ocampo, L.M., Hausbeck, M.K., Holmes, G.J. 2015. Epidemiology and population biology of pseudoperonospora cubensis: a model system for management of downy mildews. Annual Review of Phytopathology. 53:223-246.

Interpretive Summary: Downy mildew is a primary constraint to production of various cucurbit crops. In this article, we present a review of the current knowledge of the epidemiology and biology of the disease and its casual pathogen. The importance of long-distance dispersal to epidemic development is highlighted, along with implications for detection, disease prediction, and management. An important aspect of responding to this downy mildew and others is research capacity and coordination of stakeholders, researchers, and extension personnel. Concepts and approaches developed in this pathosystem can guide future efforts when responding to incursions of new or re-emerging downy mildew pathogens.

Technical Abstract: The resurgence of cucurbit downy mildew has dramatically influenced production of cucurbits and disease management systems at multiple scales. Long-distance dispersal is a fundamental aspect of epidemic development that influences the timing and extent of disease outbreaks. Dispersal potential of the pathogen appears to be limited primarily by sporangia production in source fields, sporangia survival during transport, and availability of susceptible hosts. Uncertainty remains regarding the role of locally produced inoculum in disease outbreaks, but evidence suggests multiple sources of primary inoculum could be important. Understanding pathogen diversity and population differentiation is a critical aspect of disease management and an active research area. Underpinning advances in our understanding of pathogen biology and disease management has been the research capacity and coordination of stakeholders, researchers, and extension personnel. Concepts and approaches developed in this pathosystem can guide future efforts when responding to incursions of new or re-emerging downy mildew pathogens.