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ARS Home » Plains Area » Fort Collins, Colorado » Center for Agricultural Resources Research » Plant and Animal Genetic Resources Preservation » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #321239

Research Project: Plant and Microbial Genetic Resource Preservation and Quality Assessment

Location: Plant and Animal Genetic Resources Preservation

Title: Seed quality characteristics of a broad range of taxa collected by the SOS program

Author
item Miller, Annette
item Greene, Stephanie
item Gurza, Amy

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/15/2015
Publication Date: 4/10/2015
Citation: Miller, A.L., Greene, S.L., Vogt, A.M. 2015. Seed quality characteristics of a broad range of taxa collected by the SOS program. Meeting Abstract. National Native Seed Conference, Santa Fe, NM. April 13-16, 2015.

Interpretive Summary: The National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation (NCGRP) has provided long term storage of back up seed samples for the Seeds of Success program since 2005. Between 2005 and 2014, NCGRP received about 8800 Seeds of Success (SOS) samples, representing over 700 species. In the process of testing SOS seed for viability and preparing samples for long term storage, seed quality challenges have emerged. These include the presence of inert and contaminants, dormancy issues, mechanical damage, and insect damage. Some wild-collected taxa produce high quality, low dormancy seed, while other taxa are more problematic.

Technical Abstract: The National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation (NCGRP) has provided long term storage of back up seed samples for the Seeds of Success program since 2005. Between 2005 and 2014, NCGRP received about 8800 Seeds of Success (SOS) samples, representing over 700 species. In the process of testing SOS seed for viability and preparing samples for long term storage, seed quality challenges have emerged. These include the presence of inert and contaminants, dormancy issues, mechanical damage, and insect damage. Some wild-collected taxa produce high quality, low dormancy seed, while other taxa are more problematic. Drawing on our observations within taxa, we’ll summarize taxon-specific trends in seed quality and dormancy.