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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Systematic Entomology Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #321030

Research Project: Systematics of Lepidoptera: Invasive Species, Pest and Biological Control Agents

Location: Systematic Entomology Laboratory

Title: An illustrative guide to the identification of the known species of Diatraea Guilding (Lepidoptera: Crambidae: Crambinae) based on genitalia

Author
item Solis, M
item Metz, Mark

Submitted to: ZooKeys
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/22/2015
Publication Date: 2/17/2016
Citation: Solis, M.A., Metz, M. 2016. An illustrative guide to the identification of the known species of Diatraea Guilding (Lepidoptera: Crambidae: Crambinae) based on genitalia. ZooKeys. 565:73-121 doi: 10.3897/zookeys.565.6797.

Interpretive Summary: The sugarcane borer and closely related species in the genus Diatraea cause extensive damage to sugarcane, corn, rice, and sorghum in the Western Hemisphere. It is estimated the sugarcane borer costs 200 million dollars annually to producers worldwide. This modern study provides keys to male and female genitalia for identification of the known 41 species. It is important to U.S. quarantine because Diatraea is commonly intercepted at U.S. ports and most of the species occur in other areas of the Western Hemisphere. It will be used by sugarcane growers, quarantine and state workers throughout the Western Hemisphere.

Technical Abstract: The genus Diatraea is one of the most economically important groups of moths in the Western Hemisphere. The larvae are stem borers that feed on species of Poaceae, or grasses, such as sugarcane, corn, rice, and sorghum, as well as many other native grasses. Interest in this group has risen considerably since sugarcane and other grasses have been utilized and/or investigated as biofuels. This is the first modern study to treat all 41 described species. Most type specimens were examined and we provide a checklist with new synonyms. We provide keys for the identification of most species in this genus based on morphology of the male and female genitalia, and modern illustrations of male and female genitalia.